Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wilson, William Julius
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1997

    Wilson, one of our foremost authorities on race and poverty, challenges decades of liberal and conservative pieties to look squarely at the devastating effects that joblessness has had on our urban ghettos. Marshaling a vast array of data and the personal stories of hundreds of men and women, Wilson persuasively argues that problems endemic to America's inner cities--from fatherless households to drugs and violent crime--stem directly from the disappearance of blue-collar jobs in the wake of a globalized economy. Wilson's achievement is to portray this crisis as one that affects all Americans, and to propose solutions whose benefits would be felt across our society. At a time when welfare is ending and our country's racial dialectic is more strained than ever, When Work Disappears is a sane, courageous, and desperately important work. (publisher abstract)

    Wilson, one of our foremost authorities on race and poverty, challenges decades of liberal and conservative pieties to look squarely at the devastating effects that joblessness has had on our urban ghettos. Marshaling a vast array of data and the personal stories of hundreds of men and women, Wilson persuasively argues that problems endemic to America's inner cities--from fatherless households to drugs and violent crime--stem directly from the disappearance of blue-collar jobs in the wake of a globalized economy. Wilson's achievement is to portray this crisis as one that affects all Americans, and to propose solutions whose benefits would be felt across our society. At a time when welfare is ending and our country's racial dialectic is more strained than ever, When Work Disappears is a sane, courageous, and desperately important work. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Marks, Ellen L.; Dewees, Sarah; Ouellette, Tammy; Koralek, Robin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act in 1996 signaled a dramatic shift in the nation’s approach to providing assistance to those among the country’s neediest populations. The concept of welfare in the United States shifted from cash assistance to economic self-sufficiency. Rural welfare populations possess unique characteristics and face unique circumstances that will affect their ability to achieve the requirements and intent of welfare reform. To build knowledge and research about effective approaches in working with rural populations, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) awarded planning grants to ten states to help develop and study strategies to move rural families from welfare to work. Although there are extensive bodies of literature both on rural matters and on welfare-related matters, there is relatively little information about rural welfare issues. This report synthesizes available knowledge and, where appropriate, draws inferences from studies about the ways that welfare reform is likely to affect rural welfare to work...

    The enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act in 1996 signaled a dramatic shift in the nation’s approach to providing assistance to those among the country’s neediest populations. The concept of welfare in the United States shifted from cash assistance to economic self-sufficiency. Rural welfare populations possess unique characteristics and face unique circumstances that will affect their ability to achieve the requirements and intent of welfare reform. To build knowledge and research about effective approaches in working with rural populations, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) awarded planning grants to ten states to help develop and study strategies to move rural families from welfare to work. Although there are extensive bodies of literature both on rural matters and on welfare-related matters, there is relatively little information about rural welfare issues. This report synthesizes available knowledge and, where appropriate, draws inferences from studies about the ways that welfare reform is likely to affect rural welfare to work strategies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle K.; Hill, Heather; Pavetti, LaDonna
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    This guide, prepared by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines mental health conditions among welfare recipients. It is intended to 1) provide an overview for welfare administrators of the common mental health conditions and the mental health system generally, 2) discuss specifically the types and prevalence of mental health disorders among welfare recipients, and 3) offer strategies for linking welfare recipients with mental health treatment and designing employment services to move these individuals into work. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: The Prevalence of Mental Health Conditions and Their Influence on Employment provides definitions for mental health and mental illness as outlined in the U.S. Surgeon General’s report and in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It also provides data on the prevalence and types of mental health disorders among the general and welfare populations, and examines how mental health may influence the probability of...

    This guide, prepared by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines mental health conditions among welfare recipients. It is intended to 1) provide an overview for welfare administrators of the common mental health conditions and the mental health system generally, 2) discuss specifically the types and prevalence of mental health disorders among welfare recipients, and 3) offer strategies for linking welfare recipients with mental health treatment and designing employment services to move these individuals into work. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: The Prevalence of Mental Health Conditions and Their Influence on Employment provides definitions for mental health and mental illness as outlined in the U.S. Surgeon General’s report and in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It also provides data on the prevalence and types of mental health disorders among the general and welfare populations, and examines how mental health may influence the probability of employment.

    • Section II: Strategies and Resources for Addressing Mental Health Conditions offers a map for understanding the available treatment options, the state and local mental health systems, and the options for paying for mental health treatment. This section also covers the difficulties low-income families may have in accessing treatment.

    • Section III: Opportunities for Welfare Offices to Address the Needs of Welfare Recipients with Mental Health Conditions provides suggestions to staff and administrators of welfare offices on strategies for linking their clients with mental health services. The section begins with guidance on developing a screening process in the welfare office for mental health conditions and then covers the ways to link clients with existing services, use TANF funds to expand existing services, and create new services within the welfare office.

    • Section IV: Meeting the Challenges to Developing Services for Welfare Recipients with Mental Health Conditions outlines some potential challenges that welfare offices working to address their clients’ mental health conditions may confront and suggestions for addressing these challenges. These suggestions include defining clear goals for the welfare office, creating a policy environment that supports participation in mental health services, managing interagency differences in goals or approaches, and educating and training staff. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Western, Bruce ; Kling, Jeffrey R. ; Weiman, David F.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    Rapid growth in the incarceration rate over the past two decades has made prison time a routine event in the life course of young, economically disadvantaged Black and Hispanic men. Although incarceration may now have large effects on economic inequality, only a few studies systematically examine the labor market experiences of ex-offenders. We review the mechanisms that plausibly link incarceration to employment and earnings and discuss the challenges of causal inference for a highly self-selected sample of criminal offenders. There is little consensus about the labor market effects of a variety of justice system sanctions, but there is consistent evidence for the negative effects of prison time on earnings, particularly among older or white-collar offenders. The labor market effects of incarceration are not yet well understood, but prior research suggests several promising avenues for future work. (author abstract)

    Rapid growth in the incarceration rate over the past two decades has made prison time a routine event in the life course of young, economically disadvantaged Black and Hispanic men. Although incarceration may now have large effects on economic inequality, only a few studies systematically examine the labor market experiences of ex-offenders. We review the mechanisms that plausibly link incarceration to employment and earnings and discuss the challenges of causal inference for a highly self-selected sample of criminal offenders. There is little consensus about the labor market effects of a variety of justice system sanctions, but there is consistent evidence for the negative effects of prison time on earnings, particularly among older or white-collar offenders. The labor market effects of incarceration are not yet well understood, but prior research suggests several promising avenues for future work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Peterson, Michael
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2002

    This literature review provides a comprehensive review of professional journals, web-based sites, and other related materials, (i.e. longitudinal studies, etc.), to determine what role Rehabilitation Services has played to date in the provision of services to welfare recipients who have disabilities and have been affected by The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

    A comprehensive exploration of a variety of literature has determined that many people within the roles of the welfare systems have disabilities which adversely affect their abilities to obtain or maintain work. Many of these individuals have document able physical and/or mental disabilities yet the welfare system lacks the expertise to effectively serve the population.

    Print and electronic literature will be examined and analyzed to determine the role Rehabilitation Services Administration has played in providing the required leadership, monies, and technical assistance necessary for helping this population gain self-sufficiency, retain welfare benefits, or obtain the...

    This literature review provides a comprehensive review of professional journals, web-based sites, and other related materials, (i.e. longitudinal studies, etc.), to determine what role Rehabilitation Services has played to date in the provision of services to welfare recipients who have disabilities and have been affected by The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996.

    A comprehensive exploration of a variety of literature has determined that many people within the roles of the welfare systems have disabilities which adversely affect their abilities to obtain or maintain work. Many of these individuals have document able physical and/or mental disabilities yet the welfare system lacks the expertise to effectively serve the population.

    Print and electronic literature will be examined and analyzed to determine the role Rehabilitation Services Administration has played in providing the required leadership, monies, and technical assistance necessary for helping this population gain self-sufficiency, retain welfare benefits, or obtain the necessary federal/state subsidy(ies) in order to sustain their quality of life.

    The literature evaluated provided evidence that Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) has initiated the appropriate leadership, monies, and technical assistance to meet the needs of the population. RSA has allocated funds for Research and Demonstration Projects to aide States in developing state-of-the-art programs that will in turn provide best practices on a national level for serving welfare recipients who have disabilities. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1997 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations