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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hershey, Alan M.; Pavetti, LaDonna A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    Most welfare-to-work programs designed to help single mothers leave welfare for employment focus on the challenge of finding a job. This article looks beyond the point of employment to consider the difficulty many former welfare recipients have keeping their jobs. The authors review evidence showing that many families cycle back and forth between welfare and work, losing jobs and returning to public assistance while they seek work again. Factors contributing to high rates of job loss include characteristics of the job and of the worker: Temporary jobs, frequent layoffs, low pay in relation to work expenses, lack of experience meeting employer expectations, and personal or family problems all lead to dismissals and resignations. Drawing from the experience of innovative programs, the authors recommend policy changes and program approaches that can help families overcome setbacks and stabilize their lives as they move from welfare into increasingly stable employment. (author abstract)

    Most welfare-to-work programs designed to help single mothers leave welfare for employment focus on the challenge of finding a job. This article looks beyond the point of employment to consider the difficulty many former welfare recipients have keeping their jobs. The authors review evidence showing that many families cycle back and forth between welfare and work, losing jobs and returning to public assistance while they seek work again. Factors contributing to high rates of job loss include characteristics of the job and of the worker: Temporary jobs, frequent layoffs, low pay in relation to work expenses, lack of experience meeting employer expectations, and personal or family problems all lead to dismissals and resignations. Drawing from the experience of innovative programs, the authors recommend policy changes and program approaches that can help families overcome setbacks and stabilize their lives as they move from welfare into increasingly stable employment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Haskins, Ron; Isaacs, Julia B.; Sawhill, Isabel V.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Americans have long believed that those who work hard can achieve success and that each generation will be better off than the last one. This belief has made Americans more tolerant of growing inequality than the citizens of other advanced nations. But how much opportunity to get ahead actually exists in America? In this new volume, Brookings scholars Julia Isaacs, Isabel Sawhill and Ron Haskins summarize research and provide new evidence on both the extent of intergenerational mobility in the United States and the factors that influence it. (Author introduction)

    Americans have long believed that those who work hard can achieve success and that each generation will be better off than the last one. This belief has made Americans more tolerant of growing inequality than the citizens of other advanced nations. But how much opportunity to get ahead actually exists in America? In this new volume, Brookings scholars Julia Isaacs, Isabel Sawhill and Ron Haskins summarize research and provide new evidence on both the extent of intergenerational mobility in the United States and the factors that influence it. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Vu, Catherine M.; Anthony, Elizabeth K.; Austin, Michael J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005 reauthorized the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant program through 2010 and expanded work participation standards by putting increased pressure on states to meet stricter work participation rate requirements. If states fail to meet these requirements or make adequate progress, they will face potentially severe federal fiscal sanctions. This analysis presents the major findings from a literature review on engagement strategies for the welfare-to-work population, with implications for meeting participation requirements and helping families achieve self-sufficiency from a program perspective. Major findings of this review include an effective combination of the labor force attachment (LFA) and the human capital development (HCD) approaches, program models, and participant- and organization-focused strategies. (author abstract)

     

    The Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005 reauthorized the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) block grant program through 2010 and expanded work participation standards by putting increased pressure on states to meet stricter work participation rate requirements. If states fail to meet these requirements or make adequate progress, they will face potentially severe federal fiscal sanctions. This analysis presents the major findings from a literature review on engagement strategies for the welfare-to-work population, with implications for meeting participation requirements and helping families achieve self-sufficiency from a program perspective. Major findings of this review include an effective combination of the labor force attachment (LFA) and the human capital development (HCD) approaches, program models, and participant- and organization-focused strategies. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: O'Leary, Christopher J.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2009

    This presentation, prepared for the 2009 NASWA Winter Policy Forum, provides an overview of the effectiveness of common strategies intended to increase reemployment and where they have been implemented across the United States. It lays out desired outcomes that can be measured to gauge the effectiveness of these strategies and gives outcomes for selected programs.

    This presentation, prepared for the 2009 NASWA Winter Policy Forum, provides an overview of the effectiveness of common strategies intended to increase reemployment and where they have been implemented across the United States. It lays out desired outcomes that can be measured to gauge the effectiveness of these strategies and gives outcomes for selected programs.

  • Individual Author: Loprest, Pamela J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The share of low-income single mothers disconnected from work and TANF ranges from 20 to 25 percent. Most disconnected low-income single mothers experience barriers to work and most of their families live in poverty. This brief reviews what we know about the numbers and characteristics of disconnected mothers, their economic well-being, their living arrangements, and the length of time that they tend to be disconnected. The brief draws lessons for policy, including efforts for keep TANF recipients in great need from losing TANF benefits and becoming disconnected and to improve employment prospects for those with serious challenges to work. (author abstract)

    The share of low-income single mothers disconnected from work and TANF ranges from 20 to 25 percent. Most disconnected low-income single mothers experience barriers to work and most of their families live in poverty. This brief reviews what we know about the numbers and characteristics of disconnected mothers, their economic well-being, their living arrangements, and the length of time that they tend to be disconnected. The brief draws lessons for policy, including efforts for keep TANF recipients in great need from losing TANF benefits and becoming disconnected and to improve employment prospects for those with serious challenges to work. (author abstract)

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