Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Fisher, Gordon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    During the first year or so after the 1995 issuance of the report of the National Research Council's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, there appeared to be relatively little government response to it. Since then, however, there has been a good deal of research and related activities to lay the groundwork for possible adoption of some form of the Panel's recommendations as a new official poverty measure for the U.S. A number of relevant papers resulting from this research are available on the Census Bureau's Experimental Poverty Measures Internet site. This research is summarized in the first part of this paper; a summary of the Panel's main recommendations forms the second part. (author abstract)

    During the first year or so after the 1995 issuance of the report of the National Research Council's Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, there appeared to be relatively little government response to it. Since then, however, there has been a good deal of research and related activities to lay the groundwork for possible adoption of some form of the Panel's recommendations as a new official poverty measure for the U.S. A number of relevant papers resulting from this research are available on the Census Bureau's Experimental Poverty Measures Internet site. This research is summarized in the first part of this paper; a summary of the Panel's main recommendations forms the second part. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moffitt, Robert A.; Ver Ploeg, Michele
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2001

    With the passing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, the United States embarked on a major social experiment with its social welfare and safety net programs for the poor. The most far-reaching reform of the cash welfare system for single mothers since 1935, PRWORA replaced the federal entitlement program for low-income families and children (Aid to Families with Dependent Children, AFDC) with a state-administered block grant program, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Determining the consequences of this experiment is of great importance. Has welfare reform “worked?” What were the effects of the reforms on families and individuals? What reforms worked for whom and why? In looking toward the development of new policies to aid low-income families, which elements of the new welfare system need to be changed and which left as is?

    For these fundamental questions to be answered adequately, two issues need to be addressed. First, how should one go about answering these...

    With the passing of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, the United States embarked on a major social experiment with its social welfare and safety net programs for the poor. The most far-reaching reform of the cash welfare system for single mothers since 1935, PRWORA replaced the federal entitlement program for low-income families and children (Aid to Families with Dependent Children, AFDC) with a state-administered block grant program, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Determining the consequences of this experiment is of great importance. Has welfare reform “worked?” What were the effects of the reforms on families and individuals? What reforms worked for whom and why? In looking toward the development of new policies to aid low-income families, which elements of the new welfare system need to be changed and which left as is?

    For these fundamental questions to be answered adequately, two issues need to be addressed. First, how should one go about answering these questions— what methods should be used and what types of studies should be conducted in order to determine the effects of welfare reform? Second, what types of data are needed to measure the effects of welfare reform? Are federal and state data sources currently available sufficient to carry out needed evaluations, and, if not, what investments in that infrastructure are needed?

    To answer these questions, the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council formed the Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs. This panel is sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) through a congressional appropriation. The charge to the panel is to review methods and data needed to evaluate the outcomes of changes in social welfare programs on families and individuals. The panel is specifically charged with assisting the department in (1) identifying how best to measure and track program eligibility, participation, child well-being, and other outcomes; (2) evaluating data, research designs, and methods for the study of welfare reform outcomes; and (3) identifying needed areas and topics of research. In doing so, the panel was asked to consider alternative federal and state data sources, the limitations of currently available data, appropriate evaluation designs and methods for analysis, and findings from previous research and evaluation. The panel is also specifically charged with reviewing data needs and methods for tracking and assessing the effects of program changes on families who stop receiving cash assistance—i.e., welfare leavers. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bugg, Paul; Johnson, David S.; French, Dwight K.; Bauman, Kurt J.; Short, Kathleen S.; Campbell, Laurence S.; Robinson, Brooks B.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    This report, which is being issued as a companion piece to Poverty in the United States: 2002 (P60-222),  describes some possible next steps in the Census Bureau’s decades-long tradition of investigation into the measurement of poverty. The current official poverty measure… is based on an examination of the adequacy of an individual’s or family’s income relative to poverty thresholds. The Census Bureau also publishes two series of alternative poverty estimates…

    This report describes a third new avenue for research – consumption-based measures using expenditures and other indicators of material well-being – that is intended to complement the official income-based measures and the two existing series of alternative poverty estimates to expand our understanding of the nature of poverty in the United States…

    This report is an attempt to provide some basic information on supplemental measures of material well-being. The purpose is to initiate an active discussion of the issues involved with supplementing income-based poverty measures with other measures that focus more...

    This report, which is being issued as a companion piece to Poverty in the United States: 2002 (P60-222),  describes some possible next steps in the Census Bureau’s decades-long tradition of investigation into the measurement of poverty. The current official poverty measure… is based on an examination of the adequacy of an individual’s or family’s income relative to poverty thresholds. The Census Bureau also publishes two series of alternative poverty estimates…

    This report describes a third new avenue for research – consumption-based measures using expenditures and other indicators of material well-being – that is intended to complement the official income-based measures and the two existing series of alternative poverty estimates to expand our understanding of the nature of poverty in the United States…

    This report is an attempt to provide some basic information on supplemental measures of material well-being. The purpose is to initiate an active discussion of the issues involved with supplementing income-based poverty measures with other measures that focus more heavily on consumption and material well-being…

    Section II provides some background on the underlying concepts of defining and measuring consumption, including a discussion of some of the research and data requirements for calculating expenditure-based poverty measures. Section III includes currently available information on some direct indicators of material well-being from three surveys: the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Consumer Expenditure Survey, and the Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Section IV describes research that is relevant to formulating all of these supplemental measures. The final section of the report is an extensive bibliography, including some relevant references not cited in this report. This presentation illustrates some of the information that could be used, along with income, to examine the economic well-being of families in the United States. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Vaughan, Denton R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    This article will discuss the role that the systematically measured judgments of the public at large might play in the measurement of poverty. Special attention will be given to how such assessments might be used to set the minimum income associated with a poverty welfare level and to track such a level over moderately long periods of time. The central importance of understanding how of the public's views of poverty thresholds vary with respect to secular trends in real family income will be stressed. It will be argued that this can best be done by thinking through the issue in the broadest possible social science framework. Indeed, before the reasonableness of any updated poverty threshold can be assessed, it is important to think more carefully about the sort of social processes that translate increases in real income into increases in the value of a minimally adequate income in the eyes of the members of society and how these processes work. By way of an empirical illustration, particular attention will be given to how one threshold series, based on the so-called Gallup get-...

    This article will discuss the role that the systematically measured judgments of the public at large might play in the measurement of poverty. Special attention will be given to how such assessments might be used to set the minimum income associated with a poverty welfare level and to track such a level over moderately long periods of time. The central importance of understanding how of the public's views of poverty thresholds vary with respect to secular trends in real family income will be stressed. It will be argued that this can best be done by thinking through the issue in the broadest possible social science framework. Indeed, before the reasonableness of any updated poverty threshold can be assessed, it is important to think more carefully about the sort of social processes that translate increases in real income into increases in the value of a minimally adequate income in the eyes of the members of society and how these processes work. By way of an empirical illustration, particular attention will be given to how one threshold series, based on the so-called Gallup get-along question, has varied over the post-World War II period with respect to median family income on both a before- and after-tax basis. The same series will be used to move a recent one-time assessment of the poverty threshold by a representative sample of the public back to the late 1940's. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Fisher, Gordon M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    A “standard budget” is a list of goods and services that a family of a specified size and composition would need to live at a designated level of well-being, together with the costs of those goods and services. Considerable work on standard budgets has been done in the United States and other countries in recent years, mostly by non-government analysts. Budgets have not been used to develop official poverty lines, and in most cases have not been used to calculate the size of a nation’s low-income population. This paper provides an overview for American policy analysts and poverty researchers of this recent work on standard budgets. Advantages and disadvantages of the methodology are also discussed. (author introduction)

    A follow-up paper updated this resource for the years  2006 to 2012.

    A “standard budget” is a list of goods and services that a family of a specified size and composition would need to live at a designated level of well-being, together with the costs of those goods and services. Considerable work on standard budgets has been done in the United States and other countries in recent years, mostly by non-government analysts. Budgets have not been used to develop official poverty lines, and in most cases have not been used to calculate the size of a nation’s low-income population. This paper provides an overview for American policy analysts and poverty researchers of this recent work on standard budgets. Advantages and disadvantages of the methodology are also discussed. (author introduction)

    A follow-up paper updated this resource for the years  2006 to 2012.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1999 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations