Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Baider, Allegra; Frank, Abbey
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) provisions in the fiscal year 2006 federal budget bill—known as the “Deficit Reduction Act of 2005” (DRA)—will require most states to substantially increase the number of TANF recipients participating in work-related activities. Since many of the families who continue to receive cash assistance under TANF have significant barriers to employment, it is essential that state strategies to increase participation address the needs and circumstances of these families. This paper highlights transitional jobs, a promising strategy that can help TANF recipients with barriers succeed in the labor market while simultaneously helping states meet higher participation rates by engaging more participants in work activities. It is one of a series of papers being issued by the Center for Law and Social Policy to help state legislators, program administrators, and advocates understand the new TANF rules, the choices before them, and the research and experience that can aid in program design and implementation. (author abstract)

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) provisions in the fiscal year 2006 federal budget bill—known as the “Deficit Reduction Act of 2005” (DRA)—will require most states to substantially increase the number of TANF recipients participating in work-related activities. Since many of the families who continue to receive cash assistance under TANF have significant barriers to employment, it is essential that state strategies to increase participation address the needs and circumstances of these families. This paper highlights transitional jobs, a promising strategy that can help TANF recipients with barriers succeed in the labor market while simultaneously helping states meet higher participation rates by engaging more participants in work activities. It is one of a series of papers being issued by the Center for Law and Social Policy to help state legislators, program administrators, and advocates understand the new TANF rules, the choices before them, and the research and experience that can aid in program design and implementation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sawhill, Isabel V.; Haskins, Ron
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2009

    Americans believe economic opportunity is as fundamental a right as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. More concerned about a level playing field for all, they worry less about the growing income and wealth disparity in our country. Creating an Opportunity Society examines economic opportunity in the United States and explores how to create more of it, particularly for those on the bottom rungs of the economic ladder. Ron Haskins and Isabel Sawhill propose a concrete agenda for increasing opportunity that is cost effective, consistent with American values, and focuses on improving the lives of the young and the disadvantaged. They emphasize individual responsibility as an indispensable basis for successful policies and programs. The authors recommend a three-pronged approach to create more opportunity in America: " Increase education for children and youth at the preschool, K--12, and postsecondary levels " Encourage and support work among adults " Reduce the number of out-of-wedlock births while increasing the share of children reared by their married parents With...

    Americans believe economic opportunity is as fundamental a right as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. More concerned about a level playing field for all, they worry less about the growing income and wealth disparity in our country. Creating an Opportunity Society examines economic opportunity in the United States and explores how to create more of it, particularly for those on the bottom rungs of the economic ladder. Ron Haskins and Isabel Sawhill propose a concrete agenda for increasing opportunity that is cost effective, consistent with American values, and focuses on improving the lives of the young and the disadvantaged. They emphasize individual responsibility as an indispensable basis for successful policies and programs. The authors recommend a three-pronged approach to create more opportunity in America: " Increase education for children and youth at the preschool, K--12, and postsecondary levels " Encourage and support work among adults " Reduce the number of out-of-wedlock births while increasing the share of children reared by their married parents With concern for the federal deficit in mind, Haskins and Sawhill argue for reallocating existing resources, especially from the affluent elderly to disadvantaged children and their families. The authors are optimistic that a judicious use of the nation's resources can level the playing field and produce more opportunity for all. Creating an Opportunity Society offers the most complete summary available of the facts and the factors that contribute to economic opportunity. It looks at the poor, the middle class, and the rich, providing deep background data on how each group has fared in recent decades. Unfortunately, only the rich have made substantial progress, making this book a timely guide forward for anyone interested in what we can do as a society to improve the prospects for our less-advantaged families and fellow citizens. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The budget for the U.S. Department of Labor for Fiscal Year 2010 includes a total of $45 million to support and study transitional jobs. This paper describes the origins of the transitional jobs models that are operating today, reviews the evidence on the effectiveness of this approach and other subsidized employment models, and offers some suggestions regarding the next steps for program design and research. The paper was produced for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by MDRC as part of the Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ project, which includes two random assignment evaluations of transitional jobs programs.

    Transitional jobs programs provide temporary, wage-paying jobs, support services, and job placement help to individuals who have difficulty getting and holding jobs in the regular labor market. Although recent evaluation results have raised doubts about whether TJ programs, as currently designed, are an effective way to improve participants’ long-term employment prospects, the studies have also confirmed that TJ programs can be operated at...

    The budget for the U.S. Department of Labor for Fiscal Year 2010 includes a total of $45 million to support and study transitional jobs. This paper describes the origins of the transitional jobs models that are operating today, reviews the evidence on the effectiveness of this approach and other subsidized employment models, and offers some suggestions regarding the next steps for program design and research. The paper was produced for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by MDRC as part of the Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ project, which includes two random assignment evaluations of transitional jobs programs.

    Transitional jobs programs provide temporary, wage-paying jobs, support services, and job placement help to individuals who have difficulty getting and holding jobs in the regular labor market. Although recent evaluation results have raised doubts about whether TJ programs, as currently designed, are an effective way to improve participants’ long-term employment prospects, the studies have also confirmed that TJ programs can be operated at scale, can create useful work opportunities for very disadvantaged people, and can lead to critical indirect impacts such as reducing recidivism among former prisoners. Thus, in drawing lessons from the recent results, the paper argues that it may be important to think more broadly about the goals of TJ programs while simultaneously testing new strategies that may produce better long-term employment outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Barden, Bret
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS Workshop discusses previous research on subsidized employment as well as emerging research related to two new projects: Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) and Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD).

    This powerpoint presentation from the 2015 NAWRS Workshop discusses previous research on subsidized employment as well as emerging research related to two new projects: Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) and Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD).

  • Individual Author: Wissel, Sarah; Hartog, Jacob; Sama-Miller, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Most employment and training interventions for low-income adults consist of a variety of services, strategies or approaches intended to improve employment and earnings. Many also include strategies to address other needs of the target population, such as housing. To enable quicker comparison across interventions, the Employment Strategies for Low-Income Adults Evidence Review identified a primary strategy for each multi-strategy intervention the review examined.

    Primary service strategies identified include:

    • Education
    • Training
    • Work-Readiness Activities
    • Subsidized Employment/Transitional Jobs
    • Employment Retention Services
    • Case Management
    • Financial Incentives or Sanctions
    • Supportive Services
    • Health Services

    This guide describes the process for identifying a primary strategy, and lists a primary strategy for each intervention. (author abstract)

    Most employment and training interventions for low-income adults consist of a variety of services, strategies or approaches intended to improve employment and earnings. Many also include strategies to address other needs of the target population, such as housing. To enable quicker comparison across interventions, the Employment Strategies for Low-Income Adults Evidence Review identified a primary strategy for each multi-strategy intervention the review examined.

    Primary service strategies identified include:

    • Education
    • Training
    • Work-Readiness Activities
    • Subsidized Employment/Transitional Jobs
    • Employment Retention Services
    • Case Management
    • Financial Incentives or Sanctions
    • Supportive Services
    • Health Services

    This guide describes the process for identifying a primary strategy, and lists a primary strategy for each intervention. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2006 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations