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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Clagett, Craig A.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: O'Leary, Christopher J.; Straits, Robert A.; Wandner, Stephen A.
    Year: 2005

    This book provides a broad overview of federally funded job training programs. The notable list of contributors review what training consists of and how training programs are implemented under WIA. In particular, they examine training service providers and methods of delivering training services, including the use of individual training accounts and eligible training provider lists.

    Performance management under WIA is examined, as well as the effectiveness of training programs. In addition, public training programs are compared to private training provided in the United States and to public training programs offered in other industrial nations. (author abstract)

    Contents

    1. U.S. Job Training: Types, Participants, and History / Christopher J. O'Leary, Robert A. Straits, Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Performance Management of U.S. Job Training Programs / Burt S. Barnow, Jeffrey A. Smith
    3. The Effectiveness of Publicly Financed Training in the United States: Implications for WIA and Related Programs / Christopher T. King
    4. ...

    This book provides a broad overview of federally funded job training programs. The notable list of contributors review what training consists of and how training programs are implemented under WIA. In particular, they examine training service providers and methods of delivering training services, including the use of individual training accounts and eligible training provider lists.

    Performance management under WIA is examined, as well as the effectiveness of training programs. In addition, public training programs are compared to private training provided in the United States and to public training programs offered in other industrial nations. (author abstract)

    Contents

    1. U.S. Job Training: Types, Participants, and History / Christopher J. O'Leary, Robert A. Straits, Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Performance Management of U.S. Job Training Programs / Burt S. Barnow, Jeffrey A. Smith
    3. The Effectiveness of Publicly Financed Training in the United States: Implications for WIA and Related Programs / Christopher T. King
    4. Implementation Issues in Delivering Training Services to Adults under WIA / Ronald D'Amico, Jeffrey Salzman
    5. The Use of Service Providers and Brokers/Consultants in Employment and Training Programs / Janet O. Javar, Stephen A. Wandner
    6. Individual Training Accounts, Eligible Training Provider Lists and Consumer Reporting Systems / Paul Decker, Irma Perez-Johnson
    7. The Scope of Employer-Provided Training in the United States: Who, What, Where, and How Much? / Robert I. Lerman, Signe-Mary Mckernan, Stephanie Riegg
    8. International Experience with Job Training: Lessons for the United States / Lori G. Kletzer, William L. Koch
    9. Public Job Training: Experience and Prospects / Christopher J. O'Leary, Robert A. Straits, Stephen A. Wandner
  • Individual Author: Greenberg, David H.; Michalopoulos, Charles; Robin, Philip K.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between 1964 and 1998. The results suggest that experimental and nonexperimental evaluations yield similar conclusions about the effectiveness of training programs, but that estimates of average effects for youth and possibly men might have been larger in experimental studies. The results also suggest that variation among nonexperimental estimates of program effects is similar to variation among experimental estimates for men and youth, but not for women (for whom it seems to be larger), although small sample sizes make the estimated differences somewhat imprecise for all three groups. The policy implications of the findings are discussed. (Author abstract). 

    This paper uses meta-analysis to investigate whether random assignment (or experimental) evaluations of voluntary government-funded training programs for the disadvantaged have produced different conclusions than nonexperimental evaluations. Information includes several hundred estimates from 31 evaluations of 15 programs that operated between 1964 and 1998. The results suggest that experimental and nonexperimental evaluations yield similar conclusions about the effectiveness of training programs, but that estimates of average effects for youth and possibly men might have been larger in experimental studies. The results also suggest that variation among nonexperimental estimates of program effects is similar to variation among experimental estimates for men and youth, but not for women (for whom it seems to be larger), although small sample sizes make the estimated differences somewhat imprecise for all three groups. The policy implications of the findings are discussed. (Author abstract). 

  • Individual Author: King, Christopher T.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The Workforce Narrative project, a two-year initiative funded by The Annie E. Casey Foundation, examined new ways of thinking about workforce development, and the challenges presented by lacking attention from policymakers to this critical system. As part of the project, this paper presents a comprehensive view of workforce development, including common pitfalls in considering the effectiveness of workforce development interventions. (author abstract)

    The Workforce Narrative project, a two-year initiative funded by The Annie E. Casey Foundation, examined new ways of thinking about workforce development, and the challenges presented by lacking attention from policymakers to this critical system. As part of the project, this paper presents a comprehensive view of workforce development, including common pitfalls in considering the effectiveness of workforce development interventions. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schumacher, Rachel
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2009

    Early experiences and relationships – including those in child care settings—help shape the architecture of the brain. All babies and toddlers in child care need nurturing, responsive providers and caregivers they can trust to care for them as they grow and learn. To support this goal, CLASP recommends that states seek to ensure access to specialized professional development for providers working with infants and toddlers, including participation in higher education programs, community-level training, ongoing individualized consultations, and access to appropriate information and supports for caregivers, so that all those who care for infants and toddlers in all settings understand and implement a core body of knowledge and skills.

    This document presents research supporting the recommendation to provide access to training, education, and ongoing supports. (author abstract)

    Early experiences and relationships – including those in child care settings—help shape the architecture of the brain. All babies and toddlers in child care need nurturing, responsive providers and caregivers they can trust to care for them as they grow and learn. To support this goal, CLASP recommends that states seek to ensure access to specialized professional development for providers working with infants and toddlers, including participation in higher education programs, community-level training, ongoing individualized consultations, and access to appropriate information and supports for caregivers, so that all those who care for infants and toddlers in all settings understand and implement a core body of knowledge and skills.

    This document presents research supporting the recommendation to provide access to training, education, and ongoing supports. (author abstract)

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