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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    This table describes the current and recently completed child care research conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG). (author abstract)

    This table describes the current and recently completed child care research conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sweeney, Eileen; Schott, Liz; Lazere, Ed; Fremstad, Shawn; Goldberg, Heidi; Guyer, Jocelyn; Super, David; Johnson, Clifford
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This report describes an array of innovative strategies and practical ideas for helping low-income families with children. There is a window of opportunity for these new strategies as many states have tremendous financial resources available. The Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) program rules have been clarified, and families are running up to the time limits which welfare reform imposed in 1996. The proposals are organized into three categories. The first, providing work supports for low-income families, includes suggestions for: (1) worker stipends; (2) state earned income tax credits; (3) transportation assistance; (4) accessible and affordable child care; (5) job retention and advancement services; (6) short-term aid; (7) expanded health care coverage; and (8) incentives to pay child support. A second section discusses addressing barriers parents face to enable them to work, and the third section considers the needs of specific populations, such as the disabled, legal immigrants, victims of violence, and low-income noncustodial parents. The primary focus is on...

    This report describes an array of innovative strategies and practical ideas for helping low-income families with children. There is a window of opportunity for these new strategies as many states have tremendous financial resources available. The Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) program rules have been clarified, and families are running up to the time limits which welfare reform imposed in 1996. The proposals are organized into three categories. The first, providing work supports for low-income families, includes suggestions for: (1) worker stipends; (2) state earned income tax credits; (3) transportation assistance; (4) accessible and affordable child care; (5) job retention and advancement services; (6) short-term aid; (7) expanded health care coverage; and (8) incentives to pay child support. A second section discusses addressing barriers parents face to enable them to work, and the third section considers the needs of specific populations, such as the disabled, legal immigrants, victims of violence, and low-income noncustodial parents. The primary focus is on promising initiatives that can be financed through the use of federal or state welfare funds. Two innovative strategies that can draw on federal or federally matched funds available through the Medicaid or food stamp programs are also included. Appendixes A and B discuss the rules governing use of TANF, and Appendix C discusses food stamp eligibility and benefits. Two other appendixes contain resources for additional information and a list of proposals cited in the report. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gruber, Jonathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    There are a host of potentially risky behaviors in which youth engage, which have important implications for both their well being as youth and their life prospects. The past decade has seen dramatic shifts in the intensity with which youths pursue these risky activities: for example, youth homicide fell by 40%; teen births decline by 20%; youth smoking rose by 33%; and marijuana use among youth virtually doubled. This paper, and the volume it introduces, explores the determinants and implications of risky behaviors by youths. I begin by reviewing perspectives on youth risk-taking from traditional rational-choice economics, developmental psychology, and behavioral economics. I then discuss both cross-sectional and time series evidence on risk-taking by youths, and how this compares to adults. I review the evidence on youth risk taking from the studies in this volume, and highlight the conclusions that (a) economic incentives and macroeconomic conditions are powerful predictors of risk taking by youths, (b) despite this, these factors are not very successful in predicting the...

    There are a host of potentially risky behaviors in which youth engage, which have important implications for both their well being as youth and their life prospects. The past decade has seen dramatic shifts in the intensity with which youths pursue these risky activities: for example, youth homicide fell by 40%; teen births decline by 20%; youth smoking rose by 33%; and marijuana use among youth virtually doubled. This paper, and the volume it introduces, explores the determinants and implications of risky behaviors by youths. I begin by reviewing perspectives on youth risk-taking from traditional rational-choice economics, developmental psychology, and behavioral economics. I then discuss both cross-sectional and time series evidence on risk-taking by youths, and how this compares to adults. I review the evidence on youth risk taking from the studies in this volume, and highlight the conclusions that (a) economic incentives and macroeconomic conditions are powerful predictors of risk taking by youths, (b) despite this, these factors are not very successful in predicting the dramatic time series swings we see in youth risk taking, and (c) risk taking by youths appears to have important implications for risky behaviors later in life. I also comment on the implications of these findings for policy, and for future economic research. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cook, Judith A.; Razzano, Lisa
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    This article presents research-based principles of vocational rehabilitation that have emerged from the study of diagnostically heterogeneous populations of persons with severe mental illness. Employment and vocational functioning outcomes of people with schizophrenia from recently published followup studies are described. In addition, we present research conducted over the past decade concerning differential outcomes of vocational rehabilitation services for people with schizophrenia versus other psychotic and nonpsychotic disorders. We then explore studies of people with schizophrenia that may illuminate the links between specific features of this disorder—including symptomatology, social skills, and neuropsychological impairments—and poorer vocational outcome. We conclude with a set of recommendations for clinical practice that draw upon the most recent discoveries and insights in this field. (Author abstract)

    This article presents research-based principles of vocational rehabilitation that have emerged from the study of diagnostically heterogeneous populations of persons with severe mental illness. Employment and vocational functioning outcomes of people with schizophrenia from recently published followup studies are described. In addition, we present research conducted over the past decade concerning differential outcomes of vocational rehabilitation services for people with schizophrenia versus other psychotic and nonpsychotic disorders. We then explore studies of people with schizophrenia that may illuminate the links between specific features of this disorder—including symptomatology, social skills, and neuropsychological impairments—and poorer vocational outcome. We conclude with a set of recommendations for clinical practice that draw upon the most recent discoveries and insights in this field. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle K.; Hill, Heather; Pavetti, LaDonna
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    This guide, prepared by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines mental health conditions among welfare recipients. It is intended to 1) provide an overview for welfare administrators of the common mental health conditions and the mental health system generally, 2) discuss specifically the types and prevalence of mental health disorders among welfare recipients, and 3) offer strategies for linking welfare recipients with mental health treatment and designing employment services to move these individuals into work. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: The Prevalence of Mental Health Conditions and Their Influence on Employment provides definitions for mental health and mental illness as outlined in the U.S. Surgeon General’s report and in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It also provides data on the prevalence and types of mental health disorders among the general and welfare populations, and examines how mental health may influence the probability of...

    This guide, prepared by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., for the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines mental health conditions among welfare recipients. It is intended to 1) provide an overview for welfare administrators of the common mental health conditions and the mental health system generally, 2) discuss specifically the types and prevalence of mental health disorders among welfare recipients, and 3) offer strategies for linking welfare recipients with mental health treatment and designing employment services to move these individuals into work. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: The Prevalence of Mental Health Conditions and Their Influence on Employment provides definitions for mental health and mental illness as outlined in the U.S. Surgeon General’s report and in the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It also provides data on the prevalence and types of mental health disorders among the general and welfare populations, and examines how mental health may influence the probability of employment.

    • Section II: Strategies and Resources for Addressing Mental Health Conditions offers a map for understanding the available treatment options, the state and local mental health systems, and the options for paying for mental health treatment. This section also covers the difficulties low-income families may have in accessing treatment.

    • Section III: Opportunities for Welfare Offices to Address the Needs of Welfare Recipients with Mental Health Conditions provides suggestions to staff and administrators of welfare offices on strategies for linking their clients with mental health services. The section begins with guidance on developing a screening process in the welfare office for mental health conditions and then covers the ways to link clients with existing services, use TANF funds to expand existing services, and create new services within the welfare office.

    • Section IV: Meeting the Challenges to Developing Services for Welfare Recipients with Mental Health Conditions outlines some potential challenges that welfare offices working to address their clients’ mental health conditions may confront and suggestions for addressing these challenges. These suggestions include defining clear goals for the welfare office, creating a policy environment that supports participation in mental health services, managing interagency differences in goals or approaches, and educating and training staff. (author abstract)

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