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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1972

    This statute amended the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 and the National School Lunch Act of 1946 and created the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) as a pilot program.

    Public Law 92-433 (1972).

    This statute amended the Child Nutrition Act of 1966 and the National School Lunch Act of 1946 and created the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) as a pilot program.

    Public Law 92-433 (1972).

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1975

    This statute amended the National School Lunch and Child Nutrition Acts. Most notably, it took pilot programs for the School Breakfast Program and the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and made them permanent. It also extended those programs to cover people who had not been previously eligible.

    Public Law No. 94-105 (1975).

    This statute amended the National School Lunch and Child Nutrition Acts. Most notably, it took pilot programs for the School Breakfast Program and the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) and made them permanent. It also extended those programs to cover people who had not been previously eligible.

    Public Law No. 94-105 (1975).

  • Individual Author: Blau, David
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1991

    This volume presents results from state-of-the-art economic analyses of child care issues in a form accessible to the nonspecialist. The chapters have been written by economists who are engaged in path-breaking work on child care. The results of this research have to date typically been published in academic economics journals or in technical reports to sponsoring agencies. The authors of the chapters in this book have recognized the need to disseminate their findings to a wide audience and have consequently written papers that report their research results in a nontechnical way, but without sacrificing their key insights. The goal of the volume is to bring basic principles and findings of the economic analysis of child care into wide currency among groups and individuals with a strong interest in and knowledge of child care issues but without the expertise to conduct or evaluate sophisticated economic research. Economists with an interest in child care should also find the volume useful. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction - David Blau...

    This volume presents results from state-of-the-art economic analyses of child care issues in a form accessible to the nonspecialist. The chapters have been written by economists who are engaged in path-breaking work on child care. The results of this research have to date typically been published in academic economics journals or in technical reports to sponsoring agencies. The authors of the chapters in this book have recognized the need to disseminate their findings to a wide audience and have consequently written papers that report their research results in a nontechnical way, but without sacrificing their key insights. The goal of the volume is to bring basic principles and findings of the economic analysis of child care into wide currency among groups and individuals with a strong interest in and knowledge of child care issues but without the expertise to conduct or evaluate sophisticated economic research. Economists with an interest in child care should also find the volume useful. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents

    Introduction - David Blau

    Chapter 2: Child Care Policy and Research: An Economist's Perspective - Phillip Robins and William Prosser

    Chapter 3: Public Policy and the Supply of Child Care Services - James Walker and Deborah Phillips

    Chapter 4: The Importance of Child Care Costs to Women's Decision Making - Rachel Connelly and Sandra Hofferth

    Chapter 5: Quality, Cost, and Parental Choice of Child Care - Ellen Eisker and Rebecca Maynard

    Chapter 6: The Quality of Child Care: An Economic Perspective - David Blau 

  • Individual Author: Walker, James R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth...

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth or adoption of a child. If families did not have enough dollars in their accounts to cover the cost of the leave, the federal government would extend a low-interest loan to them, which they would have to pay back. The amount individuals receive through Social Security would be adjusted upward or downward according to the balances in their parental leave accounts at retirement.

    The author suggests that both proposals would help parents balance work and family obligations and protect parental freedom of choice over the care and upbringing of their children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Helburn, Suzanne W.; Howes, Carollee
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article summarizes what is known about the cost and quality of full-time child care in centers and family child care homes, and about parents' attention to quality in making child care choices. It relies primarily upon two recent studies which are among the first to collect detailed information about child care operating costs: the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers study and the Economics of Family Child Care study. Results indicate that mediocre quality is the rule and that parents often do not choose quality settings for their children. At the present time, child care quality is only modestly related to the cost of providing services. In part, the modesty of this relationship reflects the low wages of child care staff, the availability of in-kind donations in the nonprofit sector, and the altruistic motivations of many providers that depress direct costs and the fees charged for child care. The article concludes with recommendations for future action: (1) launch consumer education efforts; (2) implement higher standards for child care at the state...

    This article summarizes what is known about the cost and quality of full-time child care in centers and family child care homes, and about parents' attention to quality in making child care choices. It relies primarily upon two recent studies which are among the first to collect detailed information about child care operating costs: the Cost, Quality, and Child Outcomes in Child Care Centers study and the Economics of Family Child Care study. Results indicate that mediocre quality is the rule and that parents often do not choose quality settings for their children. At the present time, child care quality is only modestly related to the cost of providing services. In part, the modesty of this relationship reflects the low wages of child care staff, the availability of in-kind donations in the nonprofit sector, and the altruistic motivations of many providers that depress direct costs and the fees charged for child care. The article concludes with recommendations for future action: (1) launch consumer education efforts; (2) implement higher standards for child care at the state level; (3) avoid public policies that encourage people to become child care providers if they have no interest in such a career; (4) increase public and private investments in child care; and (5) develop the means to compensate child care workers as is appropriate for their levels of training, experience, and responsibility. (author abstract)

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