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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Natalier, Kristin A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    In this paper, I present qualitative data on the ways in which 28 fathers contextualise their payment of child support in their relationships with their ex-partners, children and the Child Support Agency (CSA). Fathers described their experience in terms of either loss or resilience. Those in the loss category positioned themselves as victims of their ex-partner's use of the CSA. They understood their child support obligations as illustrative of broader processes of silencing and disempowerment, whereby their identities and practices as fathers were ignored. Those men who talked about their experiences in terms of resilience shared accounts of post-separation parenting that took place beyond the surveillance of the CSA, with parents focused on the best interests of their children. They did not experience a threat to their fathering choices or identities. The findings highlight the importance of gendered and expressive dimensions of child support. (Author abstract)

    In this paper, I present qualitative data on the ways in which 28 fathers contextualise their payment of child support in their relationships with their ex-partners, children and the Child Support Agency (CSA). Fathers described their experience in terms of either loss or resilience. Those in the loss category positioned themselves as victims of their ex-partner's use of the CSA. They understood their child support obligations as illustrative of broader processes of silencing and disempowerment, whereby their identities and practices as fathers were ignored. Those men who talked about their experiences in terms of resilience shared accounts of post-separation parenting that took place beyond the surveillance of the CSA, with parents focused on the best interests of their children. They did not experience a threat to their fathering choices or identities. The findings highlight the importance of gendered and expressive dimensions of child support. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nikolaev, Evgeni L.; Baranova, Elvira A.; Petunova, Svetlana A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The present study investigates the mother-related characteristics of family functioning that are associated with their children’s mental health problems. The sample embraced 194 young children with symptoms of mental and behavioral disorders and their mothers. The children were diagnosed during play therapy; the mothers were examined by using standardized interviews and questionnaires which measure coping and parenting styles. Behavioral and emotional disorders were more typical for boys of younger age and are related to authoritarian or rejecting parenting styles in their mothers who underestimated the importance of emotional contacts. The mothers demonstrated maladaptive coping styles. The family environment was characterized by a focus on material values, violence and alcohol abuse situations, transgenerational stereotypes of female domination. The results indicate a dysfunctional role of mothers’ coping and parenting styles in relation to their children’s mental health. (Author abstract)

    The present study investigates the mother-related characteristics of family functioning that are associated with their children’s mental health problems. The sample embraced 194 young children with symptoms of mental and behavioral disorders and their mothers. The children were diagnosed during play therapy; the mothers were examined by using standardized interviews and questionnaires which measure coping and parenting styles. Behavioral and emotional disorders were more typical for boys of younger age and are related to authoritarian or rejecting parenting styles in their mothers who underestimated the importance of emotional contacts. The mothers demonstrated maladaptive coping styles. The family environment was characterized by a focus on material values, violence and alcohol abuse situations, transgenerational stereotypes of female domination. The results indicate a dysfunctional role of mothers’ coping and parenting styles in relation to their children’s mental health. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stanley, Nicky ; Humphreys, Cathy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    'Whole family' interventions for families living with domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are emerging and some international practice examples are available. This study reports a process evaluation of a pilot delivered in Northern England that aimed to work with all members of families experiencing DVA. The evaluation involved analysis of detailed accounts of practice from learning logs and case workbooks as well as interviews with practitioners and family members. The voluntary nature of families' involvement with the pilot, together with an explicit service philosophy of 'meeting families where they are at' appeared successful in engaging families. Pilot staff worked flexibly, seeing family members together and separately, but there was evidence of lower levels of confidence in work with perpetrators. Co-work enabled skills to be transferred to other professionals and social workers increased their use of risk assessment tools in DVA cases. However, there was uncertainty as to whether interagency communication improved across local agencies, and joint protocols and tools were...

    'Whole family' interventions for families living with domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are emerging and some international practice examples are available. This study reports a process evaluation of a pilot delivered in Northern England that aimed to work with all members of families experiencing DVA. The evaluation involved analysis of detailed accounts of practice from learning logs and case workbooks as well as interviews with practitioners and family members. The voluntary nature of families' involvement with the pilot, together with an explicit service philosophy of 'meeting families where they are at' appeared successful in engaging families. Pilot staff worked flexibly, seeing family members together and separately, but there was evidence of lower levels of confidence in work with perpetrators. Co-work enabled skills to be transferred to other professionals and social workers increased their use of risk assessment tools in DVA cases. However, there was uncertainty as to whether interagency communication improved across local agencies, and joint protocols and tools were slow to develop. This study is one of the first evaluations of 'whole family' interventions in DVA, and it illustrates how, when additional resources and organisational support are made available, a non-blaming approach that families find engaging can be developed. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Child maltreatment happens in all kinds of families, but low income is the most consistent predictor. This holds true in the United States and many other nations and the correlation is substantiated by decades of research. But new research goes beyond association to reveal a causal relationship between poverty and child maltreatment. A set of studies published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review shows that poverty exists as both a cause and consequence of child abuse and neglect. Just as child maltreatment is most prevalent in poor families, mistreated children often struggle to achieve economic success as adults. This brief describes the latest statistics on child maltreatment as reported to child protective services (CPS) agencies and goes on to highlight related findings from a limited selection of the studies included in the journal. (Author abstract)

    Child maltreatment happens in all kinds of families, but low income is the most consistent predictor. This holds true in the United States and many other nations and the correlation is substantiated by decades of research. But new research goes beyond association to reveal a causal relationship between poverty and child maltreatment. A set of studies published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review shows that poverty exists as both a cause and consequence of child abuse and neglect. Just as child maltreatment is most prevalent in poor families, mistreated children often struggle to achieve economic success as adults. This brief describes the latest statistics on child maltreatment as reported to child protective services (CPS) agencies and goes on to highlight related findings from a limited selection of the studies included in the journal. (Author abstract)

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