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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Trutko, John; Strong, Debra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants Program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, provides federal funding to states and local organizations to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment, stay employed, and improve their economic situation. Low-income noncustodial parents (NCPs) (mainly fathers) of welfare children are among the main target groups for WtW services, along with custodial parents who are receiving cash assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and moving from welfare to work. This focus reflects policymakers' growing interest in strategies to increase the employment and earnings of noncustodial fathers and thereby improve their ability to provide financial support for their children and play an active role in their lives.

    WtW grants represent a new source of funding for local work-focused services to NCPs. This report describes 11 local programs funded by WtW grants, in terms of the types of organizations operating the programs, the range of services offered, and the interagency...

    The Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Grants Program, authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, provides federal funding to states and local organizations to help welfare recipients and other low-income parents move into employment, stay employed, and improve their economic situation. Low-income noncustodial parents (NCPs) (mainly fathers) of welfare children are among the main target groups for WtW services, along with custodial parents who are receiving cash assistance under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program and moving from welfare to work. This focus reflects policymakers' growing interest in strategies to increase the employment and earnings of noncustodial fathers and thereby improve their ability to provide financial support for their children and play an active role in their lives.

    WtW grants represent a new source of funding for local work-focused services to NCPs. This report describes 11 local programs funded by WtW grants, in terms of the types of organizations operating the programs, the range of services offered, and the interagency collaborations in effect. No single strategy or set of services predominates. Rather, local grant recipients have discretion in developing and implementing program models, within the parameters of the WtW regulations. Thus, the experiences of these programs illustrate a variety of strategies and approaches that are being implemented around the nation and highlight key issues that must be addressed to serve this population group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stieglitz, Ali; Johnson, Amy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR), in collaboration with the Urban Institute, has examined what local communities in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, and Oregon have done to improve the coordination of this response system. This report, funded by the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, focuses specifically on the strategies that the child support and public assistance agencies in these sites have taken to improve the interagency coordination of information and services for victims of domestic violence with regard to the child support collection process, both for domestic violence victims who want exemption from this process and those who want to collect child support safely. Sometimes this coordination of effort extends to others, such as court personnel or staff from local domestic violence service organizations. The study's primary goal is to offer guidance for policymakers and agency staff in other states as they design and implement interagency strategies to help victims pursue child support safely. Given...

    Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR), in collaboration with the Urban Institute, has examined what local communities in Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, and Oregon have done to improve the coordination of this response system. This report, funded by the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, focuses specifically on the strategies that the child support and public assistance agencies in these sites have taken to improve the interagency coordination of information and services for victims of domestic violence with regard to the child support collection process, both for domestic violence victims who want exemption from this process and those who want to collect child support safely. Sometimes this coordination of effort extends to others, such as court personnel or staff from local domestic violence service organizations. The study's primary goal is to offer guidance for policymakers and agency staff in other states as they design and implement interagency strategies to help victims pursue child support safely. Given its focused purpose, the study does not attempt to present a comprehensive analysis of child support enforcement policies, domestic violence issues, or the outcomes that resulted from the initiatives in our study sites. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Zaveri, Heather; Baumgartner, Scott; Dion, Robin; Clary, Liz
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This report describes program design and implementation of four Responsible Fatherhood programs that are part of the Parents and Children Together evaluation. The report presents data on enrollment, initial participation, retention, and the amount of services fathers received from December 2012, the beginning of PACT enrollment, through August 2014. The report then discusses two approaches to service delivery adopted by the grantees and describes how these approaches may inform patterns related to program inputs and outputs and future Responsible Fatherhood programming. (author abstract)

    This report describes program design and implementation of four Responsible Fatherhood programs that are part of the Parents and Children Together evaluation. The report presents data on enrollment, initial participation, retention, and the amount of services fathers received from December 2012, the beginning of PACT enrollment, through August 2014. The report then discusses two approaches to service delivery adopted by the grantees and describes how these approaches may inform patterns related to program inputs and outputs and future Responsible Fatherhood programming. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dion, M. Robin; Zaveri, Heather; Holcomb, Pamela
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Policy interest and support for increasing the positive involvement of fathers in their children's lives has increased substantially in recent years, with a dedicated federal funding stream for responsible fatherhood programs. These programs aim to improve fathers’ parenting, economic stability, and relationship skills, factors that are known to be associated with fathers’ socioemotional and financial support of their children. We focus on the efforts of four fatherhood programs participating in a large-scale evaluation sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. We conclude that fathers in these programs, the majority of whom have nonresidential children, are strongly motivated to be more involved with and support their children despite numerous barriers, including difficult co-parenting relationships and problems with access to their children. Findings show that large numbers of fathers voluntarily enroll and participate in fatherhood program services in an effort to improve their situations. Future reports will...

    Policy interest and support for increasing the positive involvement of fathers in their children's lives has increased substantially in recent years, with a dedicated federal funding stream for responsible fatherhood programs. These programs aim to improve fathers’ parenting, economic stability, and relationship skills, factors that are known to be associated with fathers’ socioemotional and financial support of their children. We focus on the efforts of four fatherhood programs participating in a large-scale evaluation sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. We conclude that fathers in these programs, the majority of whom have nonresidential children, are strongly motivated to be more involved with and support their children despite numerous barriers, including difficult co-parenting relationships and problems with access to their children. Findings show that large numbers of fathers voluntarily enroll and participate in fatherhood program services in an effort to improve their situations. Future reports will describe the effects of these services on the well-being of the fathers and their families.

    Key Points for the Family Court Community

    • The federal government is devoting considerable resources to programs to help fathers become more involved with and supportive of their children.
    • Many participating fathers lack formal visitation or parenting-time agreements because they were not married to the mothers of their children and no longer live with them.
    • Research to learn how these programs work is growing; this article describes preliminary findings from an evaluation of four federal responsible fatherhood programs. (author abstract)
  • Individual Author: Holcomb, Pamela; Edin, Kathryn; Max, Jeffrey; Young Jr., Alford; D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos; Friend, Daniel; Clary, Elizabeth; Johnson Jr., Waldo E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Using information from in-depth interviews conducted as part of the Parents and Children Together Evaluation, this report describes themes and findings related to fathers’ perceptions of their roles as parents, partners, and providers. Findings specifically relate to fathers’ perceptions of their own childhoods, their personal challenges, employment and child support experiences, their relationships with their children and the mothers of their children, their views on fathering, and their participation in the fatherhood programs. (author abstract)

    Using information from in-depth interviews conducted as part of the Parents and Children Together Evaluation, this report describes themes and findings related to fathers’ perceptions of their roles as parents, partners, and providers. Findings specifically relate to fathers’ perceptions of their own childhoods, their personal challenges, employment and child support experiences, their relationships with their children and the mothers of their children, their views on fathering, and their participation in the fatherhood programs. (author abstract)

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