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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Fuger, Kathryn L.; Abel, Michael B.; Duke, Dianna L.; Newkirk, Melissa K.; Arnold, Jodi D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Strengthening Families and Fatherhood: Children of Fathers in the Criminal Justice System, otherwise known as Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model, developed as an Innovation and Improvement Project (IIP), funded through the Office of Head Start. Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model (referred to in this document as Fathers for Life) addressed the priority area of Strengthening Families/Fatherhood of the President’s Head Start initiatives. Office of Head Start first awarded Missouri Department of Social Services Family Support Division (FSD) funding to develop a sound logic model and theory of change during a 9-month Planning Phase. During the 3-year Implementation Phase that followed, the logic model continued to develop as the project entered early stages of implementation. This report summarizes the project model and describes the results of these efforts in the state of Missouri, in the local communities in which it was instituted, and in the lives of the fathers who participated. Some concluding comments...

    Strengthening Families and Fatherhood: Children of Fathers in the Criminal Justice System, otherwise known as Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model, developed as an Innovation and Improvement Project (IIP), funded through the Office of Head Start. Fathers for Life – A Head Start Father Involvement Model (referred to in this document as Fathers for Life) addressed the priority area of Strengthening Families/Fatherhood of the President’s Head Start initiatives. Office of Head Start first awarded Missouri Department of Social Services Family Support Division (FSD) funding to develop a sound logic model and theory of change during a 9-month Planning Phase. During the 3-year Implementation Phase that followed, the logic model continued to develop as the project entered early stages of implementation. This report summarizes the project model and describes the results of these efforts in the state of Missouri, in the local communities in which it was instituted, and in the lives of the fathers who participated. Some concluding comments summarize the initiative, pose additional questions, and give suggestions for next steps. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hsueh, JoAnn; Farrell, Mary E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    As part of the multisite Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project, MDRC, together with its research partners, is leading an evaluation of parental employment and educational services delivered within Early Head Start (Enhanced EHS). The program model tested here aims to dually address the employment and educational needs of parents who are at risk of unemployment and the developmental needs of their children. The study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.  The study uses a rigorous random assignment design comparing outcomes for families and  children who were offered Enhanced EHS with outcomes for those who could only access alternative services in the community. This report presents the final impact results approximately 42 months after families and children first entered the study. (author abstract)

    As part of the multisite Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation Project, MDRC, together with its research partners, is leading an evaluation of parental employment and educational services delivered within Early Head Start (Enhanced EHS). The program model tested here aims to dually address the employment and educational needs of parents who are at risk of unemployment and the developmental needs of their children. The study is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor.  The study uses a rigorous random assignment design comparing outcomes for families and  children who were offered Enhanced EHS with outcomes for those who could only access alternative services in the community. This report presents the final impact results approximately 42 months after families and children first entered the study. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bir, Anupa; Lerman, Robert; Corwin, Elise; MacIlvain, Brian; Beard, Allison; Richburg, Kelly; Smith, Kevin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report describes the implementation and impacts of selected programs funded through grants awarded to a number of organizations to conduct large-scale, community-wide projects that used “various methods to support healthy marriages community-wide” (Community Healthy Marriage [CHM] Grants to Implement Multiple Allowable Activities: Level 3; Healthy Marriage Demonstration Grants. Funding Opportunity Announcement 2006). The projects were to implement simultaneously five or more of the eight allowable activities specified in the authorizing legislation, reach a broad audience, involve stakeholders from diverse community sectors (e.g., government, schools, faith-based organizations, businesses, health care providers), and offer voluntary, healthy marriage and relationship education services to reach as many interested participants as possible. Impacts, at the community level, on a range of family-life outcomes were measured utilizing a representative sample of adults in matched treatment and comparison communities. (author abstract)

    This report describes the implementation and impacts of selected programs funded through grants awarded to a number of organizations to conduct large-scale, community-wide projects that used “various methods to support healthy marriages community-wide” (Community Healthy Marriage [CHM] Grants to Implement Multiple Allowable Activities: Level 3; Healthy Marriage Demonstration Grants. Funding Opportunity Announcement 2006). The projects were to implement simultaneously five or more of the eight allowable activities specified in the authorizing legislation, reach a broad audience, involve stakeholders from diverse community sectors (e.g., government, schools, faith-based organizations, businesses, health care providers), and offer voluntary, healthy marriage and relationship education services to reach as many interested participants as possible. Impacts, at the community level, on a range of family-life outcomes were measured utilizing a representative sample of adults in matched treatment and comparison communities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bir, Anupa; Lerman, Robert; Kofke-Egger, Heather; Nichols, Austin; Smith, Kevin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report is a technical supplement to The Community Healthy Marriage Initiative Evaluation: Impacts of a Community Approach to Strengthening Families. It provides additional detail about the research design and analytic methods that were used in the impact analyses and additional supplemental analyses that explore other aspects of the demonstration. (author abstract)

    This report is a technical supplement to The Community Healthy Marriage Initiative Evaluation: Impacts of a Community Approach to Strengthening Families. It provides additional detail about the research design and analytic methods that were used in the impact analyses and additional supplemental analyses that explore other aspects of the demonstration. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sanders, Cynthia K.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

     Survivors of domestic violence often remain in abusive relationships due to limited economic resources, economic dependence on an abusive partner, and economic abuse. Viewing women who have experienced domestic violence as “survivors” suggests that when provided access to appropriate resources, they will seek help and utilize such resources allowing them to increase their stability and potentially escape an abusive partner. Assets have been shown to have a variety of positive associations with a wide range of economic, social, and psychological outcomes. Economic initiatives, such as financial education and individual development accounts (IDAs), aimed toward survivors of domestic violence are on the rise. However, to date, there are few studies. Data on IDA activity, including savings rates, withdrawals, and asset purchases, for 125 women who participated in an IDA matched-savings program for survivors of intimate-partner violence were examined. Approximately 2/3 of women reached their savings goal and 76% made at least 1 matched-savings withdrawal and asset purchase. Results...

     Survivors of domestic violence often remain in abusive relationships due to limited economic resources, economic dependence on an abusive partner, and economic abuse. Viewing women who have experienced domestic violence as “survivors” suggests that when provided access to appropriate resources, they will seek help and utilize such resources allowing them to increase their stability and potentially escape an abusive partner. Assets have been shown to have a variety of positive associations with a wide range of economic, social, and psychological outcomes. Economic initiatives, such as financial education and individual development accounts (IDAs), aimed toward survivors of domestic violence are on the rise. However, to date, there are few studies. Data on IDA activity, including savings rates, withdrawals, and asset purchases, for 125 women who participated in an IDA matched-savings program for survivors of intimate-partner violence were examined. Approximately 2/3 of women reached their savings goal and 76% made at least 1 matched-savings withdrawal and asset purchase. Results suggest survivors can be successful savers and purchase assets that may contribute to their economic stability. Implications are discussed, including the need for long-term studies to examine how participation in a matched-savings program affects women’s well-being, safety, and future experiences of intimate-partner violence. (author abstract)

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