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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Haskins, Ron; Bevan, Carol Statuto
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 1997

    As part of its 1996 welfare reform bill, Congress enacted a $50 million per year program to fund abstinence education. This chapter provides an examination of the legislative history of the program; a discussion of the characteristics of the program, especially the definition of abstinence education; and an account of how the program will be implemented by the federal government and the states. (author abstract)

    As part of its 1996 welfare reform bill, Congress enacted a $50 million per year program to fund abstinence education. This chapter provides an examination of the legislative history of the program; a discussion of the characteristics of the program, especially the definition of abstinence education; and an account of how the program will be implemented by the federal government and the states. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nathan, Richard P.; Gentry, Paola; Lawrence, Catherine
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 1998

    Although the 1996 federal welfare reform law exhorts states to reduce teen and out-of-wedlock births, preliminary field research has found few links between welfare reform and pregnancy prevention, and the ones that do exist are often tenuous, hard to describe, and difficult to assess. States have established new and stronger connections between welfare and employment services under welfare reform, but creating welfare programs that explicitly stress pregnancy prevention has been inhibited by several factors. There is little consensus on how to prevent teen and out-of-wedlock births, not just as a practical matter but also as an ethical and political issue. This divisiveness has led most states to devolve critical questions about the design of such programs down to local and community levels. Also, the health agencies that have traditionally administered pregnancy prevention programs have usually not worked closely with welfare agencies in the past. And the federal reforms provide few incentives for states to create strong linkages. Nonetheless, there is an opportunity here for...

    Although the 1996 federal welfare reform law exhorts states to reduce teen and out-of-wedlock births, preliminary field research has found few links between welfare reform and pregnancy prevention, and the ones that do exist are often tenuous, hard to describe, and difficult to assess. States have established new and stronger connections between welfare and employment services under welfare reform, but creating welfare programs that explicitly stress pregnancy prevention has been inhibited by several factors. There is little consensus on how to prevent teen and out-of-wedlock births, not just as a practical matter but also as an ethical and political issue. This divisiveness has led most states to devolve critical questions about the design of such programs down to local and community levels. Also, the health agencies that have traditionally administered pregnancy prevention programs have usually not worked closely with welfare agencies in the past. And the federal reforms provide few incentives for states to create strong linkages. Nonetheless, there is an opportunity here for leaders and groups committed to teen pregnancy prevention, regardless of the approach they favor, to forge creative linkages to welfare/employment bureaucracies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McLanahan, Sara; Garfinkel, Irv; Reichman, Nancy; Teitler, Julien
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2000

    Nearly a third of all births in the United States today occur outside marriage, up from 6 percent in the early 1960s (Ventura et al. 1995). The proportions are even higher among poor and minority populations--at 40 percent among Hispanics and 70 percent among African Americans. Non- marital childbearing also is increasing throughout the western European countries. Indeed, the rate of non- marital births is higher in the Scandinavian countries (and France) than it is in the United States (Ventura et. al. 1995). The US is different from these other countries in one important respect, however. Whereas in Europe the overwhelming majority of unwed parents are living together when their child is born, in the US less than half of new unwed parents are cohabiting. Thus, children born outside marriage in the US are much more likely to be poor and much more likely to experience father absence than children born outside marriage in other countries. Both poverty and father absence have been shown to negatively affect children’s future life chances (McLanahan and Sandefur 1994,...

    Nearly a third of all births in the United States today occur outside marriage, up from 6 percent in the early 1960s (Ventura et al. 1995). The proportions are even higher among poor and minority populations--at 40 percent among Hispanics and 70 percent among African Americans. Non- marital childbearing also is increasing throughout the western European countries. Indeed, the rate of non- marital births is higher in the Scandinavian countries (and France) than it is in the United States (Ventura et. al. 1995). The US is different from these other countries in one important respect, however. Whereas in Europe the overwhelming majority of unwed parents are living together when their child is born, in the US less than half of new unwed parents are cohabiting. Thus, children born outside marriage in the US are much more likely to be poor and much more likely to experience father absence than children born outside marriage in other countries. Both poverty and father absence have been shown to negatively affect children’s future life chances (McLanahan and Sandefur 1994, Duncan and Brooks-Gunn 1997). (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Fernandez, Leticia; Hercik, Jeanette
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2001

    The OFA Peer Technical Assistance (TA) Network is a federally funded initiative through the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Family Assistance.  The objective of the OFA Peer TA Network is to facilitate the sharing of information between and among states and to establish linkages between organizations serving the needs of welfare recipients. 

    The U.S. Administration for Children and Families (ACF), with support from the OFA Peer Technical Assistance Network, sponsored the Addressing the Needs of Non-Custodial Parents in TANF Families Workshop on January 18-19, 2001, in Tallahassee, Florida.  Participants included representatives from State Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Child Support Enforcement, local fatherhood providers, and Federal participants from the Department of Labor and the Department of Health and Human Services.  The purpose of the workshop was to promote collaboration between State TANF and OCSE agencies, and to encourage the sharing of information about initiatives to address the needs of non-custodial parents. (...

    The OFA Peer Technical Assistance (TA) Network is a federally funded initiative through the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Office of Family Assistance.  The objective of the OFA Peer TA Network is to facilitate the sharing of information between and among states and to establish linkages between organizations serving the needs of welfare recipients. 

    The U.S. Administration for Children and Families (ACF), with support from the OFA Peer Technical Assistance Network, sponsored the Addressing the Needs of Non-Custodial Parents in TANF Families Workshop on January 18-19, 2001, in Tallahassee, Florida.  Participants included representatives from State Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), Child Support Enforcement, local fatherhood providers, and Federal participants from the Department of Labor and the Department of Health and Human Services.  The purpose of the workshop was to promote collaboration between State TANF and OCSE agencies, and to encourage the sharing of information about initiatives to address the needs of non-custodial parents. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mincy, Ronald B.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2002

    This paper documents the extent and correlates of multiple partner fertility among parents in the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Survey in order to assess the opportunities and challenges that await marriage promotion policies which are attracting the attention of policy makers. We find that the majority of mothers who responded to the baseline and 12-month follow-up surveys are not first time mothers and the majority of mothers with two or more children have had at least one child with someone other than the father of their newborn. According to mothers’ reports, fathers are equally likely to exhibit multiple partner fertility. While the descriptive analysis cannot speak to causation, our results are certainly consistent with the hypothesis that multiple partner fertility reduces the probability of marriage for mothers and fathers. Multiple partner fertility is rare among teenaged mothers, but fairly high among African American mothers and fathers, which may help to explain the low-marriage probabilities. Our results suggest that marriage promotion strategies will have...

    This paper documents the extent and correlates of multiple partner fertility among parents in the Fragile Families and Child Well-being Survey in order to assess the opportunities and challenges that await marriage promotion policies which are attracting the attention of policy makers. We find that the majority of mothers who responded to the baseline and 12-month follow-up surveys are not first time mothers and the majority of mothers with two or more children have had at least one child with someone other than the father of their newborn. According to mothers’ reports, fathers are equally likely to exhibit multiple partner fertility. While the descriptive analysis cannot speak to causation, our results are certainly consistent with the hypothesis that multiple partner fertility reduces the probability of marriage for mothers and fathers. Multiple partner fertility is rare among teenaged mothers, but fairly high among African American mothers and fathers, which may help to explain the low-marriage probabilities. Our results suggest that marriage promotion strategies will have their greatest opportunity among unwed mothers in their early twenties and the fathers of their children, but high rates of multiple partner fertility are expected to reduce the effective of such efforts among African Americans. (Author abstract)

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