Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Policy Planning and Research, United States Department of Labor
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1965

    The most difficult fact for white Americans to understand is that in these terms the circumstances of the Negro American community in recent years has probably been getting worse, not better.

    Indices of dollars of income, standards of living, and years of education deceive. The gap between the Negro and most other groups in American society is widening.

    The fundamental problem, in which this is most clearly the case, is that of family structure. The evidence — not final, but powerfully persuasive — is that the Negro family in the urban ghettos is crumbling. A middle class group has managed to save itself, but for vast numbers of the unskilled, poorly educated city working class the fabric of conventional social relationships has all but disintegrated. There are indications that the situation may have been arrested in the past few years, but the general post war trend is unmistakable. So long as this situation persists, the cycle of poverty and disadvantage will continue to repeat itself.

    The thesis of this paper is that these events, in combination,...

    The most difficult fact for white Americans to understand is that in these terms the circumstances of the Negro American community in recent years has probably been getting worse, not better.

    Indices of dollars of income, standards of living, and years of education deceive. The gap between the Negro and most other groups in American society is widening.

    The fundamental problem, in which this is most clearly the case, is that of family structure. The evidence — not final, but powerfully persuasive — is that the Negro family in the urban ghettos is crumbling. A middle class group has managed to save itself, but for vast numbers of the unskilled, poorly educated city working class the fabric of conventional social relationships has all but disintegrated. There are indications that the situation may have been arrested in the past few years, but the general post war trend is unmistakable. So long as this situation persists, the cycle of poverty and disadvantage will continue to repeat itself.

    The thesis of this paper is that these events, in combination, confront the nation with a new kind of problem. Measures that have worked in the past, or would work for most groups in the present, will not work here. A national effort is required that will give a unity of purpose to the many activities of the Federal government in this area, directed to a new kind of national goal: the establishment of a stable Negro family structure. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kisker, Ellen E.; Maynard, Rebecca A.; Rangarajan, Anu; Boller, Kimberly
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1998

    Mothers who have their first child as a teenager are more likely than older mothers to go on welfare, and they spend more years on welfare over their lifetimes. Thus, they are a special focus of the most recent welfare reform legislation, which imposes strict new requirements on teenage parents. State and local agencies charged with implementing these requirements may find the lessons from three recent evaluations useful. The three recent demonstration evaluations -- of the Teenage Parent Demonstration; Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program (LEAP); and the New Chance demonstration -- offer important lessons for states and local agencies that are implementing the teenage parent provisions of the new law. (author abstract)

    Mothers who have their first child as a teenager are more likely than older mothers to go on welfare, and they spend more years on welfare over their lifetimes. Thus, they are a special focus of the most recent welfare reform legislation, which imposes strict new requirements on teenage parents. State and local agencies charged with implementing these requirements may find the lessons from three recent evaluations useful. The three recent demonstration evaluations -- of the Teenage Parent Demonstration; Ohio's Learning, Earning, and Parenting Program (LEAP); and the New Chance demonstration -- offer important lessons for states and local agencies that are implementing the teenage parent provisions of the new law. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lav, Iris J.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1999

    Congress may consider marriage-penalty tax relief this year, perhaps through an increase in the standard deduction for married-filers or creation of a new deduction for married filers with two earners. Such approaches can provide relief to middle-class families that face marriage tax penalties. But they would do nothing to alleviate the significant marriage penalties that some low- and moderate-income working families face.

    Raising the standard deduction or establishing a two-earner deduction cannot affect low- and moderate-income working families that have no income tax liability and hence cannot use larger deductions. These are families for which the combination of their personal exemptions, the standard deduction, the child credit, and if applicable, the dependent care credit eliminates their income tax liability. (author abstract)

     

    Congress may consider marriage-penalty tax relief this year, perhaps through an increase in the standard deduction for married-filers or creation of a new deduction for married filers with two earners. Such approaches can provide relief to middle-class families that face marriage tax penalties. But they would do nothing to alleviate the significant marriage penalties that some low- and moderate-income working families face.

    Raising the standard deduction or establishing a two-earner deduction cannot affect low- and moderate-income working families that have no income tax liability and hence cannot use larger deductions. These are families for which the combination of their personal exemptions, the standard deduction, the child credit, and if applicable, the dependent care credit eliminates their income tax liability. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Chun-Hoon, Wendy L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    In the past five years, the concerted effort of working families, employers, and state and county-level social services administrators, coupled with a strong economy, produced a more than 50 percent decline in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance caseloads. However, finding employment does not always translate to income security and family stability. Low-income working families, earning below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines, often live on the edge of poverty—without health care or the ability to save and build assets.

    As more parents leave public assistance, states have taken important steps toward supporting their transition into the workforce by redirecting federal grants and state funds to meet the needs of working families. Highlighting close to 30 examples, this report recognizes some of the most promising models, state policies and local program innovations supporting low-income working families around the country. The report provides an introduction to the implementation of these programs and the level of public-private...

    In the past five years, the concerted effort of working families, employers, and state and county-level social services administrators, coupled with a strong economy, produced a more than 50 percent decline in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance caseloads. However, finding employment does not always translate to income security and family stability. Low-income working families, earning below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines, often live on the edge of poverty—without health care or the ability to save and build assets.

    As more parents leave public assistance, states have taken important steps toward supporting their transition into the workforce by redirecting federal grants and state funds to meet the needs of working families. Highlighting close to 30 examples, this report recognizes some of the most promising models, state policies and local program innovations supporting low-income working families around the country. The report provides an introduction to the implementation of these programs and the level of public-private collaboration that often exists within each model. We also refer readers to helpful organizations and broader research and data on each of the topic areas…

    As the debate over how to reauthorize the TANF program proceeds in Congress, the release of this report on promising models for assisting low-income working families is, indeed, timely. While state fiscal crises pose serious impediments to continuing the progress made in recent years, there is momentum and public will to carry these important efforts forward. For individual states, recent elections present an opportunity for new leaders to build on the lessons learned by those that have already begun implementing the innovative policies and programs highlighted in this report. Changes in federal policy regarding food stamp provisions present yet another important step toward supporting families. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Burstein, Nancy R.; Lindberg, Laura D.; Fein, David J.; Page, Lindsay; LaRock, Richard J. Jr.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is the lead federal agency charged with developing and testing initiatives in this area. Mindful of the need for strong basic empirical foundation for policies and programs, ACF commissioned Abt Associates Inc. to review the evidence on important determinants of marriage and cohabitation among disadvantaged Americans. The objectives of this project were to (1) assess findings and gaps in basic research literature and (2) provide a guide to major national survey data that could be used to close the gaps. This report—which documents nine key surveys—fulfills the second of these objectives. An accompanying report presents findings from our literature review (Fein et al. 2003).

    The audience for this guide is researchers and agencies who are interested in opportunities for research on particular aspects of marriage and cohabitation determinants but are not familiar with the contents of one or more of these datasets. Discerning the pertinent attributes of national surveys for a given topic can require...

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is the lead federal agency charged with developing and testing initiatives in this area. Mindful of the need for strong basic empirical foundation for policies and programs, ACF commissioned Abt Associates Inc. to review the evidence on important determinants of marriage and cohabitation among disadvantaged Americans. The objectives of this project were to (1) assess findings and gaps in basic research literature and (2) provide a guide to major national survey data that could be used to close the gaps. This report—which documents nine key surveys—fulfills the second of these objectives. An accompanying report presents findings from our literature review (Fein et al. 2003).

    The audience for this guide is researchers and agencies who are interested in opportunities for research on particular aspects of marriage and cohabitation determinants but are not familiar with the contents of one or more of these datasets. Discerning the pertinent attributes of national surveys for a given topic can require an extensive search for documentation, and, once found, documentation for some surveys can be voluminous. We hope that the guide will help users to find their way to pertinent information more quickly. Chapters on individual surveys focus on their uses in analyses of the formation, stability and quality of marriage and cohabitation among disadvantaged populations. A concluding chapter also reviews opportunities these surveys offer to address important knowledge gaps for those topics identified in our literature review. Recognizing that the information herein is only the starting point for analysis planning, we describe how users can obtain more detailed documentation for each survey, as well as the survey data themselves. (author abstract)

    For more information on this study please see The determinants of marriage and cohabitation among disadvantaged Americans: Research findings and needs.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1965 to 2019

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations