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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Pearson, Jessica; Thoennes, Nancy; Griswold, Esther Ann
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1999

    Brief interviews with 1,082 applicants for public assistance in four Colorado welfare offices show that 40% disclose current or past abuse. When apprised of the option of obtaining an exemption to the child support requirements of the new welfare reform law, only 6.7% of victims (2.7% of applicants) expressed an interest in applying. Most women said they wanted child support and that its pursuit would pose no danger. Only one-third of the victims who expressed an interest in applying for an exemption were granted one. Two-thirds were denied because they lacked sufficient documentation to corroborate their claims of potential harm. (Author abstract)

    Brief interviews with 1,082 applicants for public assistance in four Colorado welfare offices show that 40% disclose current or past abuse. When apprised of the option of obtaining an exemption to the child support requirements of the new welfare reform law, only 6.7% of victims (2.7% of applicants) expressed an interest in applying. Most women said they wanted child support and that its pursuit would pose no danger. Only one-third of the victims who expressed an interest in applying for an exemption were granted one. Two-thirds were denied because they lacked sufficient documentation to corroborate their claims of potential harm. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    Current theories of marriage under-predict the extent of non-marriage, have not been adequately tested, or do not apply well to women with low-socioeconomic status. Furthermore, scholarly research on marriage attitudes among low-SES women suffers from a lack of up-to-date qualitative work. This study draws on qualitative interviews with 292 low-income single mothers in three U.S. cities. Inductive analysis reveals five primary motivations for non-marriage among low-income single mothers. Most mothers agree that potential marriage partners must earn significantly more than the minimum wage, but also emphasize the importance of stability of employment, source of earnings, and the effort men expend to find and keep their jobs. Mothers place equal or greater emphasis on non-monetary factors such as how marriage may diminish or enhance respectability, how it may limit their control over household decisions, their mistrust of men, and their fear of domestic violence. Affordability, respectability, and control have greater salience for African American mothers, while trust and domestic...

    Current theories of marriage under-predict the extent of non-marriage, have not been adequately tested, or do not apply well to women with low-socioeconomic status. Furthermore, scholarly research on marriage attitudes among low-SES women suffers from a lack of up-to-date qualitative work. This study draws on qualitative interviews with 292 low-income single mothers in three U.S. cities. Inductive analysis reveals five primary motivations for non-marriage among low-income single mothers. Most mothers agree that potential marriage partners must earn significantly more than the minimum wage, but also emphasize the importance of stability of employment, source of earnings, and the effort men expend to find and keep their jobs. Mothers place equal or greater emphasis on non-monetary factors such as how marriage may diminish or enhance respectability, how it may limit their control over household decisions, their mistrust of men, and their fear of domestic violence. Affordability, respectability, and control have greater salience for African American mothers, while trust and domestic violence have greater salience for whites. The author discusses these findings in relation to existing theories of marriage and in light of welfare reform. (author abstract).

  • Individual Author: Macomber, Jennifer Ehrle ; Malm, Karin; Fender, Lynne; Bess, Roseana
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Collaboration between welfare and child welfare agencies is important because there is significant overlap in the clients the two agencies serve. This "dual-system" population struggles with both poverty and child abuse or neglect. Based on visits to county agencies in 13 states, the authors provide specific examples of three types of collaborative efforts: casework practice (collaborative efforts on the front line), program development (joint efforts to create new programs and services), and organizational infrastructure (how the system supports collaborative casework and programs). The seven factors that affect collaborative efforts include agency history and politics, leadership and policy direction, resource availability, information systems, colocation of workers from both agencies in a single office, staffing and workload, confidentiality, and palpable payoffs to workers. (author abstract)

    Collaboration between welfare and child welfare agencies is important because there is significant overlap in the clients the two agencies serve. This "dual-system" population struggles with both poverty and child abuse or neglect. Based on visits to county agencies in 13 states, the authors provide specific examples of three types of collaborative efforts: casework practice (collaborative efforts on the front line), program development (joint efforts to create new programs and services), and organizational infrastructure (how the system supports collaborative casework and programs). The seven factors that affect collaborative efforts include agency history and politics, leadership and policy direction, resource availability, information systems, colocation of workers from both agencies in a single office, staffing and workload, confidentiality, and palpable payoffs to workers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pearson, Jessica; Griswold, Esther Ann; Thoennes, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    This article reports on three demonstration projects involving efforts to address the needs of public assistance applicants/recipients who are domestic violence victims while also developing effective methods to improve cooperation with child support agencies. Through various approaches, such as direct questioning, screening and referrals, and domestic violence specialists, the projects explore ways to identify victims of domestic violence, levels of interest in child support and exemptions, barriers to cooperation, and clients' responses to specialists and referrals for community-based services. (Author abstract)

    This article reports on three demonstration projects involving efforts to address the needs of public assistance applicants/recipients who are domestic violence victims while also developing effective methods to improve cooperation with child support agencies. Through various approaches, such as direct questioning, screening and referrals, and domestic violence specialists, the projects explore ways to identify victims of domestic violence, levels of interest in child support and exemptions, barriers to cooperation, and clients' responses to specialists and referrals for community-based services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Gail
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    Teenaged mothers have been the target of some welfare reforms, many of which are based on the assumption that the availability of welfare encourages teenagers to have babies. This study of 75 teenaged mothers found that welfare was not a motivator to become pregnant. However, the participants generally supported reform proposals with some modifications: time limits with additional time for teenaged mothers to complete school; requiring teenagers to continue their education or training, with provisions for child care and transportation; and flexible residency requirements with assistance to families as needed and residential programs for teenaged mothers who cannot live at home because of abusive families. They identified a wide range of necessary supports: education and/or training opportunities; access to safe and affordable child care; transportation; parenting classes; medical insurance for their children; and good paying jobs. (author abstract)

    Teenaged mothers have been the target of some welfare reforms, many of which are based on the assumption that the availability of welfare encourages teenagers to have babies. This study of 75 teenaged mothers found that welfare was not a motivator to become pregnant. However, the participants generally supported reform proposals with some modifications: time limits with additional time for teenaged mothers to complete school; requiring teenagers to continue their education or training, with provisions for child care and transportation; and flexible residency requirements with assistance to families as needed and residential programs for teenaged mothers who cannot live at home because of abusive families. They identified a wide range of necessary supports: education and/or training opportunities; access to safe and affordable child care; transportation; parenting classes; medical insurance for their children; and good paying jobs. (author abstract)

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