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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Smith, Karen E.; Favreault, Melissa M.; Butrica, Barbara; Issa, Philip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    This report describes the work the Urban Institute performed to generate the Model of Income in the Near Term, Version 6 (MINT6). MINT is a tool developed for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to analyze the distributional consequences of Social Security reform proposals. MINT is a micro-level data file of individuals born between 1926 and 2075. It starts with a rich set of income and demographic characteristics from the 2001 and 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) data linked to SSA data on earnings and benefits. MINT then projects these characteristics until death or the year 2099. (author abstract)

    This report describes the work the Urban Institute performed to generate the Model of Income in the Near Term, Version 6 (MINT6). MINT is a tool developed for the Social Security Administration (SSA) to analyze the distributional consequences of Social Security reform proposals. MINT is a micro-level data file of individuals born between 1926 and 2075. It starts with a rich set of income and demographic characteristics from the 2001 and 2004 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) data linked to SSA data on earnings and benefits. MINT then projects these characteristics until death or the year 2099. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Tan, Erwin J.; Georges, Annie ; Gabbard, Susan M.; Pratt, Donald J. ; Nerino, Anthony; Roberts, Angela S. ; Wrightsman, Stephanie M. ; Hyde, Mary
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    This study was a census of Senior Companion Program (SCP) and Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) volunteers (both Senior Corps programs) to see:

    • Whether SCP and FGP were successfully recruiting and retaining diverse, low-income volunteers as they are intended to;
    • How the two programs compare to each other in this regard;
    • How SCP and FGP volunteers compare to respondents to the national Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) in terms of self-reported health, mobility-associated disability, and life satisfaction.

    The study found that:

    • Across both programs, respondents were 55–104 years of age, with a mean age of 72 years.
    • Across both programs, respondents were 45% white, 40% African American, 2% Native American or Alaskan Native, 3% Asian American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander, and 6% other or more than one race selected.
    • Approximately 90% of Foster Grandparents and 83% of Senior Companions were women.
    • Approximately 41% of Foster Grandparents were African American compared with 38% of Senior...

    This study was a census of Senior Companion Program (SCP) and Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) volunteers (both Senior Corps programs) to see:

    • Whether SCP and FGP were successfully recruiting and retaining diverse, low-income volunteers as they are intended to;
    • How the two programs compare to each other in this regard;
    • How SCP and FGP volunteers compare to respondents to the national Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) in terms of self-reported health, mobility-associated disability, and life satisfaction.

    The study found that:

    • Across both programs, respondents were 55–104 years of age, with a mean age of 72 years.
    • Across both programs, respondents were 45% white, 40% African American, 2% Native American or Alaskan Native, 3% Asian American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander, and 6% other or more than one race selected.
    • Approximately 90% of Foster Grandparents and 83% of Senior Companions were women.
    • Approximately 41% of Foster Grandparents were African American compared with 38% of Senior Companions.
    • Approximately 21% of Foster Grandparents did not graduate from high school or did not have a GED compared with 26% of Senior Companions.
    • Foster Grandparents reported an average of 6.4 years in service compared with 6.1 years for Senior Companions.

    In short, the Foster Grandparent Program and the Senior Companion Program engage a diverse population of low-income adults age 55 and older in high-intensity volunteer activity. Men were underrepresented in both FGP and SCP. Compared to HRS respondents who volunteer, the study found that SCP and FGP volunteers showed:

    • No statistical difference in the prevalence of excellent/very good health.
    • Higher prevalence of problems walking or inability to walk one-block.
    • Statistically significant higher prevalence of reported life satisfaction. (Author abstract)
  • Individual Author: Gibson-Davis, Christina M.; Percheski, Christine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Life cycle theory predicts that elderly households have higher levels of wealth than households with children, but these wealth gaps are likely dynamic, responding to changes in labor market conditions, patterns of debt accumulation, and the overall economic context. Using Survey of Consumer Finances data from 1989 through 2013, we compare wealth levels between and within the two groups that make up America’s dependents: the elderly and child households (households with a resident child aged 18 or younger). Over the observed period, the absolute wealth gap between elderly and child households in the United States increased substantially, and diverging trends in wealth accumulation exacerbated preexisting between-group disparities. Widening gaps were particularly pronounced among the least-wealthy elderly and child households. Differential demographic change in marital status and racial composition by subgroup do not explain the widening gap. We also find increasing wealth inequality within child households and the rise of a “parental 1%.” During a time of overall economic growth...

    Life cycle theory predicts that elderly households have higher levels of wealth than households with children, but these wealth gaps are likely dynamic, responding to changes in labor market conditions, patterns of debt accumulation, and the overall economic context. Using Survey of Consumer Finances data from 1989 through 2013, we compare wealth levels between and within the two groups that make up America’s dependents: the elderly and child households (households with a resident child aged 18 or younger). Over the observed period, the absolute wealth gap between elderly and child households in the United States increased substantially, and diverging trends in wealth accumulation exacerbated preexisting between-group disparities. Widening gaps were particularly pronounced among the least-wealthy elderly and child households. Differential demographic change in marital status and racial composition by subgroup do not explain the widening gap. We also find increasing wealth inequality within child households and the rise of a “parental 1%.” During a time of overall economic growth, the elderly have been able to maintain or increase their wealth, whereas many of the least-wealthy child households saw precipitous declines. Our findings suggest that many child households may lack sufficient assets to promote the successful flourishing of the next generation. (Author abstract)