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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Moe, Angela M.; Bell, Myrtle P.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Research on the effects of battering on women’s lives has focused on poverty, homelessness, and welfare receipt, often centering on women who are uneducated or undereducated. The authors analyze how battering impacts the work and employability of women from various employment levels and backgrounds. Data were obtained through qualitative interviews with 19 residents of a domestic violence shelter, some of whom had obtained substantial education and built solid and lucrative careers prior to being abused. The women described instances in which battering had obstructed their ability to find work, maintain employment, and use their wages to establish greater economic independence and safety. (author abstract)

    Research on the effects of battering on women’s lives has focused on poverty, homelessness, and welfare receipt, often centering on women who are uneducated or undereducated. The authors analyze how battering impacts the work and employability of women from various employment levels and backgrounds. Data were obtained through qualitative interviews with 19 residents of a domestic violence shelter, some of whom had obtained substantial education and built solid and lucrative careers prior to being abused. The women described instances in which battering had obstructed their ability to find work, maintain employment, and use their wages to establish greater economic independence and safety. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schindler, Holly S.; Coley, Rebekah L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    The present qualitative research focuses on homeless fathers living with their children in family shelters. Data were collected through semistructured, face-to-face interviews with homeless fathers (n= 9) and shelter directors (n= 3). Findings suggest that how fathers made meaning of their experiences in a homeless shelter was related to contextual factors and constructions of masculinity. Contextual constraints deriving from unemployment, behavioral and psychological restrictions of shelters, and new parenting roles led men to reassess their parental and masculine role identities. Results further suggest that homeless shelters may provide a unique point for intervention services to assist poor fathers. (author abstract)

    The present qualitative research focuses on homeless fathers living with their children in family shelters. Data were collected through semistructured, face-to-face interviews with homeless fathers (n= 9) and shelter directors (n= 3). Findings suggest that how fathers made meaning of their experiences in a homeless shelter was related to contextual factors and constructions of masculinity. Contextual constraints deriving from unemployment, behavioral and psychological restrictions of shelters, and new parenting roles led men to reassess their parental and masculine role identities. Results further suggest that homeless shelters may provide a unique point for intervention services to assist poor fathers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shah, Melissa F.; Mancuso, David; He, Lijian; Estee, Sharon; Felver, Barbara E. M.; Beall, Kathryn; Fiedler, Fred
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program provides cash assistance to low-income families and aids parents in gaining employment and achieving economic self-sufficiency. As part of the state's reexamination of the program, the DSHS Research and Data Analysis (RDA) division analyzed risk factors and outcomes for TANF adults and children over the five year period from state fiscal year (SFY) 2005-2009. These analyses suggest that expanding behavioral health treatment to TANF parents has the potential to: 1) reduce adverse outcomes, 2) prevent behavioral health problems among children, and 3) achieve cost savings through both the avoidance of adverse outcomes and the prevention of disability. (author abstract)

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program provides cash assistance to low-income families and aids parents in gaining employment and achieving economic self-sufficiency. As part of the state's reexamination of the program, the DSHS Research and Data Analysis (RDA) division analyzed risk factors and outcomes for TANF adults and children over the five year period from state fiscal year (SFY) 2005-2009. These analyses suggest that expanding behavioral health treatment to TANF parents has the potential to: 1) reduce adverse outcomes, 2) prevent behavioral health problems among children, and 3) achieve cost savings through both the avoidance of adverse outcomes and the prevention of disability. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Courtney, Mark E.; Osgood, D. W. ; Foster, Michael
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    D. Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney examine the transition to adult- hood for youth involved in social service and justice systems during childhood and adolescence. They survey the challenges faced by youth in the mental health system, the foster care system, the juvenile justice system, the criminal justice system, and special education, and by youth with physical disabilities and chronic illness, as well as runaway and homeless youth.

    One problem is that the services these vulnerable populations receive from these systems as children and adolescents often end abruptly as they transition to adulthood, even though the need for them continues. Youth must leave systems tailored for clients their age and, if they are eligible for further services at all, enter adult systems that are not equipped to address their needs. One exception is the special education system, whose services extend into early adult- hood and are designed for individuals’ needs.

    The authors review current public policies directed toward vulnerable youth in transition and find...

    D. Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney examine the transition to adult- hood for youth involved in social service and justice systems during childhood and adolescence. They survey the challenges faced by youth in the mental health system, the foster care system, the juvenile justice system, the criminal justice system, and special education, and by youth with physical disabilities and chronic illness, as well as runaway and homeless youth.

    One problem is that the services these vulnerable populations receive from these systems as children and adolescents often end abruptly as they transition to adulthood, even though the need for them continues. Youth must leave systems tailored for clients their age and, if they are eligible for further services at all, enter adult systems that are not equipped to address their needs. One exception is the special education system, whose services extend into early adult- hood and are designed for individuals’ needs.

    The authors review current public policies directed toward vulnerable youth in transition and find problems in four areas: eligibility criteria that exclude youth from services that might benefit them, inadequate funding for transition services, a lack of coordination across service systems, and inadequate training about young-adult developmental issues for service professionals.

    The authors then discuss policy options that can help create a developmentally appropriate and socially inclusive system of support for vulnerable youth. Among the options are strengthening all programs for youth in transition, improving the existing systems of care for children and adolescents, addressing the loss of access to services at the age of majority, and coordinating today’s multiple systems into a single coherent system. The authors see heightened governmental interest in better supports for vulnerable young adults, both through expanding the federal role in their lives and through improving coordination of the systems that serve them. The Fostering Connections Act of 2008, for example, extended services to adolescents in foster care from the age of eighteen to the age of twenty-one. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Swann-Jackson, Rebecca; Tapper, Donna; Fields, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Keeping Families Together (KFT) is a pilot initiative of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) that was designed to test the impact of permanent supportive housing for families who had been involved with the child welfare system and who had been homeless for at least a year. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the initiative targeted the most vulnerable families, aiming to improve agency collaboration in support of these families and build capacity among providers to serve them...

    Metis Associates conducted its evaluation of the KFT pilot between September 2009 and May 2010. The evaluation, which was designed to assess the extent to which the initiative met its objectives, built on work begun by Dr. Sylvia Ridlen, the project's first evaluator. It includes a retrospective assessment of the implementation of the pilot initiative and an outcome evaluation that has examined the impact of the initiative on participating KFT families. Metis conducted a review of program documentation, focus group interviews with supportive housing providers (directors...

    Keeping Families Together (KFT) is a pilot initiative of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) that was designed to test the impact of permanent supportive housing for families who had been involved with the child welfare system and who had been homeless for at least a year. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the initiative targeted the most vulnerable families, aiming to improve agency collaboration in support of these families and build capacity among providers to serve them...

    Metis Associates conducted its evaluation of the KFT pilot between September 2009 and May 2010. The evaluation, which was designed to assess the extent to which the initiative met its objectives, built on work begun by Dr. Sylvia Ridlen, the project's first evaluator. It includes a retrospective assessment of the implementation of the pilot initiative and an outcome evaluation that has examined the impact of the initiative on participating KFT families. Metis conducted a review of program documentation, focus group interviews with supportive housing providers (directors and case managers) and families, and interviews with representatives of city agencies, interviews with CSH staff and the project's clinical consultant. Limited data from interviews with KFT families conducted by Dr. Ridlen also were incorporated into this report. Several types of administrative data were analyzed. For consenting families, child welfare data were obtained from the New York City Administration for Children’s Services (ACS). Education data on public school students in the KFT families were accessed from a repository maintained by Metis through an agreement with the New York City Department of Education. Data on homelessness for a comparison group of similarly situated families who did not enter supportive housing were provided by the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS). Additional data on KFT families were obtained from case managers' records. (author summary)

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