Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Oliker, Stacey J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    To suggest some questions, conceptual frameworks, and directions for research into the effects on caregiving of mandatory-work programs, I draw upon studies of kinship and personal networks in sociology and anthropology and from my own study of work and family among single mothers on welfare during the last years of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). In the largest cities of two states, I observed and conducted in-depth interviews of single mothers on welfare and program workers in welfare-to-work programs. Using those qualitative data, I reported mothers’ accounts of earning and caring, paying particular attention to the personal networks of these mothers—their size and structure, the roles of network members, the frequency and directions of exchange, the resources people brought to the network, and the obligations they incurred. (author introduction)

    To suggest some questions, conceptual frameworks, and directions for research into the effects on caregiving of mandatory-work programs, I draw upon studies of kinship and personal networks in sociology and anthropology and from my own study of work and family among single mothers on welfare during the last years of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). In the largest cities of two states, I observed and conducted in-depth interviews of single mothers on welfare and program workers in welfare-to-work programs. Using those qualitative data, I reported mothers’ accounts of earning and caring, paying particular attention to the personal networks of these mothers—their size and structure, the roles of network members, the frequency and directions of exchange, the resources people brought to the network, and the obligations they incurred. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Leavitt, Katharine L.; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Although our Maryland study shows results that do not reflect the dire outcomes some child welfare advocates anticipated, a lack of comparable research under the old AFDC system limits the interpretation of emerging TANF and child welfare/foster care data. Only with baseline empirical data on the rate at which former AFDC children entered child welfare can we truly determine whether the rates of entry being observed under TANF are lower, higher, or about the same as historical rates. This report seeks to fill this important gap in information for Maryland. Using administrative data, it describes the pre-reform relationship between exits from AFDC and entries into the child welfare system. (author abstract)

    Although our Maryland study shows results that do not reflect the dire outcomes some child welfare advocates anticipated, a lack of comparable research under the old AFDC system limits the interpretation of emerging TANF and child welfare/foster care data. Only with baseline empirical data on the rate at which former AFDC children entered child welfare can we truly determine whether the rates of entry being observed under TANF are lower, higher, or about the same as historical rates. This report seeks to fill this important gap in information for Maryland. Using administrative data, it describes the pre-reform relationship between exits from AFDC and entries into the child welfare system. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Rachel A.; Heinrich, Carolyn J.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2003

    Historically, few programs have provided job training services with a family orientation, even with clear goals of encouraging marriage and two-parent families in more recent welfare reforms. The researchers present results of a non-experimental, multi-method evaluation of the Full Family Partnership (FFP) demonstration located at Jobs for Youth (JFY)/Chicago that assisted young couples in committed relationships in entering the workforce. Econometric analyses indicate that young mothers -- who stayed in the FFP program longer than their partners and utilized more of the family-focused supportive services -- had significantly larger gains in employment and earnings and decreases in TANF receipt upon program exit relative to both mothers receiving standard, individually-oriented services at JFY and mothers participating in JTPA. In addition, descriptive analyses indicate that a majority of participating couples were still together at one year post-program and many increased their commitment to their relationship. This study considers several program components that may have...

    Historically, few programs have provided job training services with a family orientation, even with clear goals of encouraging marriage and two-parent families in more recent welfare reforms. The researchers present results of a non-experimental, multi-method evaluation of the Full Family Partnership (FFP) demonstration located at Jobs for Youth (JFY)/Chicago that assisted young couples in committed relationships in entering the workforce. Econometric analyses indicate that young mothers -- who stayed in the FFP program longer than their partners and utilized more of the family-focused supportive services -- had significantly larger gains in employment and earnings and decreases in TANF receipt upon program exit relative to both mothers receiving standard, individually-oriented services at JFY and mothers participating in JTPA. In addition, descriptive analyses indicate that a majority of participating couples were still together at one year post-program and many increased their commitment to their relationship. This study considers several program components that may have contributed to these effects, including the motivation partners provide one another through simultaneous program participation and the increased provision of family-focused services to participants. These are key program elements that might be considered as policymakers and program developers seek to meet the needs of a diverse range of young couples who are raising children while entering the workforce. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Leavitt, Katharine; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    Although the finding that child welfare involvement is higher among children in later-leaving families may not be surprising, it is of concern because children continue to represent the majority of welfare recipients (and thus welfare leavers) in our state and nationally. In addition, Maryland has made concerted, bi-partisan efforts to craft a welfare reform program that would work efficiently and effectively for the state and its families, while not having an adverse effect on either. Through the Joint Committee on Welfare Reform and our ongoing research projects, the state has continued to pay close attention to the evolution and outcomes of reform, and since the program’s inception in 1996, “as needed” enhancements have been made through a series of Welfare Innovation Acts. Consistent with Maryland’s long-established tradition of using empirical data to monitor program outcomes and provide policymakers with reliable information about emerging trends, this paper takes a closer look at the trend of increased Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement among later-leaving TCA...

    Although the finding that child welfare involvement is higher among children in later-leaving families may not be surprising, it is of concern because children continue to represent the majority of welfare recipients (and thus welfare leavers) in our state and nationally. In addition, Maryland has made concerted, bi-partisan efforts to craft a welfare reform program that would work efficiently and effectively for the state and its families, while not having an adverse effect on either. Through the Joint Committee on Welfare Reform and our ongoing research projects, the state has continued to pay close attention to the evolution and outcomes of reform, and since the program’s inception in 1996, “as needed” enhancements have been made through a series of Welfare Innovation Acts. Consistent with Maryland’s long-established tradition of using empirical data to monitor program outcomes and provide policymakers with reliable information about emerging trends, this paper takes a closer look at the trend of increased Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement among later-leaving TCA youngsters. Specifically, the study uses multivariate analyses to determine if the observed trend is due to differences among cohorts in risk factors or is independent of these baseline family differences. The next chapter provides a more in-depth review of the current policy context as well as the empirical literature on risk factors for child abuse and neglect. (author abstract)

    An article based on this report has been published in the journal Children and Youth Services Review.

  • Individual Author: Ovwigho, Pamela Caudill; Leavitt, Katharine L.; Born, Catherine E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    Recent research has documented that those leaving TANF in the later years of reform face more challenges to leaving welfare for work and may not be faring as well as earlier exiters. The present study utilizes data from a large-scale, longitudinal study of TANF leavers to examine risk factors for child maltreatment, particularly focusing on the question of higher risk for later leavers. The sample, from Maryland’s Life After Welfare study, includes 17,441 children from 8,900 families who exited TANF between October 1996 and March 2001. Of these children, 7.3% (n = 1,269) experienced a child protective services investigation during the first year after exit, in which abuse or neglect was substantiated or indicated. Discrete time event history analysis revealed several significant predictors of child abuse and neglect, with child welfare history emerging as the strongest predictor. Moreover, we find that risk of a substantiated CPS report is higher for later leaving families, even after controlling for family characteristics and post-exit experiences. These results suggest that...

    Recent research has documented that those leaving TANF in the later years of reform face more challenges to leaving welfare for work and may not be faring as well as earlier exiters. The present study utilizes data from a large-scale, longitudinal study of TANF leavers to examine risk factors for child maltreatment, particularly focusing on the question of higher risk for later leavers. The sample, from Maryland’s Life After Welfare study, includes 17,441 children from 8,900 families who exited TANF between October 1996 and March 2001. Of these children, 7.3% (n = 1,269) experienced a child protective services investigation during the first year after exit, in which abuse or neglect was substantiated or indicated. Discrete time event history analysis revealed several significant predictors of child abuse and neglect, with child welfare history emerging as the strongest predictor. Moreover, we find that risk of a substantiated CPS report is higher for later leaving families, even after controlling for family characteristics and post-exit experiences. These results suggest that policy makers and program managers may need to consider providing extra support to families with a child welfare history who are exiting the rolls in the later years of reform. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a report published by the University of Maryland School of Social Work.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1999 to 2012

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations