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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hao, Lingxin
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2007

    The growing number of immigrants living and working in America has become a controversial topic from classrooms to corporations and from kitchen tables to Capitol Hill. Many native-born Americans fear that competition from new arrivals will undermine the economic standing of low-skilled American workers, and that immigrants may not successfully integrate into the U.S. economy. In Color Lines, Country Lines, sociologist Lingxin Hao argues that the current influx of immigrants is changing America’s class structure, but not in the ways commonly believed.

    Drawing on twenty years of national survey data, Color Lines, Country Lines investigates how immigrants are faring as they try to accumulate enough wealth to join the American middle class, and how, in the process, they are transforming historic links between race and socioeconomic status. Hao finds that disparities in wealth among immigrants are large and growing, including disparities among immigrants of the same race or ethnicity. Cuban immigrants have made substantially more progress than arrivals from the Dominican...

    The growing number of immigrants living and working in America has become a controversial topic from classrooms to corporations and from kitchen tables to Capitol Hill. Many native-born Americans fear that competition from new arrivals will undermine the economic standing of low-skilled American workers, and that immigrants may not successfully integrate into the U.S. economy. In Color Lines, Country Lines, sociologist Lingxin Hao argues that the current influx of immigrants is changing America’s class structure, but not in the ways commonly believed.

    Drawing on twenty years of national survey data, Color Lines, Country Lines investigates how immigrants are faring as they try to accumulate enough wealth to join the American middle class, and how, in the process, they are transforming historic links between race and socioeconomic status. Hao finds that disparities in wealth among immigrants are large and growing, including disparities among immigrants of the same race or ethnicity. Cuban immigrants have made substantially more progress than arrivals from the Dominican Republic, Chinese immigrants have had more success than Vietnamese or Korean immigrants, and Jamaicans have fared better than Haitians and immigrants from sub-Saharan Africa. Indeed, many of these immigrant groups have acquired more wealth than native-born Americans of the same race or ethnicity. Hao traces these diverging paths to differences in the political and educational systems of the immigrants’ home countries, as well as to preferential treatment of some groups by U.S. immigration authorities and the U.S. labor market. As a result, individuals’ country of origin increasingly matters more than their race in determining their prospects for acquiring wealth. In a novel analysis, Hao predicts that as large numbers of immigrants arrive in the United States every year, the variation in wealth within racial groups will continue to grow, reducing wealth inequalities between racial groups. If upward mobility remains restricted to only some groups, then the old divisions of wealth by race will gradually become secondary to new disparities based on country of origin. However, if the labor market and the government are receptive to all immigrant groups, then the assimilation of immigrants into the middle class will help diminish wealth inequality in society as a whole.

    Immigrants’ assimilation into the American mainstream and the impact of immigration on the American economy are inextricably linked, and each issue can only be understood in light of the other. Color Lines, Country Lines shows why some immigrant groups are struggling to get by while others have managed to achieve the American dream and reveals the surprising ways in which immigration is reshaping American society. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF)
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2008

    Acknowledging financial assets as the foundation to financial stability and long-term wealth accumulation, the Assets for Independence demonstration program targets the needs of low-income individuals and families for advancement through financial education and matched savings accounts. Building Assets * Building Stronger Families extends these principles by providing tools and strategies to integrate asset-building and family stability within ACF-supported programs. This manual presents an overview of asset-building and a series of 50 training modules for family-focused programs to showcase the profound connection between economic security and strong families. ACF programs can use this resource to promote family-strengthening activities as appropriate within their respective projects. (author abstract)

    Acknowledging financial assets as the foundation to financial stability and long-term wealth accumulation, the Assets for Independence demonstration program targets the needs of low-income individuals and families for advancement through financial education and matched savings accounts. Building Assets * Building Stronger Families extends these principles by providing tools and strategies to integrate asset-building and family stability within ACF-supported programs. This manual presents an overview of asset-building and a series of 50 training modules for family-focused programs to showcase the profound connection between economic security and strong families. ACF programs can use this resource to promote family-strengthening activities as appropriate within their respective projects. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Center for Family and Marriage Research
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2009

    Description: The economic downturn in late 2008 prompted important questions about the familial consequences of economic uncertainty as well as how family environments influence coping and stress associated with financial instability (e.g., employment, income, asset accumulation, consumption patterns, public assistance usage). To address these topics, new data were urgently needed. The National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR) aimed to fill this critical gap by sponsoring a data collection initiative on families and economic distress.

    Population: A survey of 1,000 adults aged 18 years and older from the general population was conducted. The survey was completed by 1,014 respondents out of 1,517 cases (66.8 percent response rate). 

    Periodicity: Data collected in 2009.

    (information adapted from publisher)

    Description: The economic downturn in late 2008 prompted important questions about the familial consequences of economic uncertainty as well as how family environments influence coping and stress associated with financial instability (e.g., employment, income, asset accumulation, consumption patterns, public assistance usage). To address these topics, new data were urgently needed. The National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR) aimed to fill this critical gap by sponsoring a data collection initiative on families and economic distress.

    Population: A survey of 1,000 adults aged 18 years and older from the general population was conducted. The survey was completed by 1,014 respondents out of 1,517 cases (66.8 percent response rate). 

    Periodicity: Data collected in 2009.

    (information adapted from publisher)

  • Individual Author: Edelstein, Sara; Lowenstein, Christopher
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Youth transitioning out of foster care and into adulthood need many supports to navigate the challenges they face. Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Foster Care Independence Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to create the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (the Chafee Program). This amendment doubled the maximum amount of funds potentially available to states for independent living services and gave states greater discretion over how they use those funds. More recently, a provision in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 gave states an option to extend eligibility for Title IV-E foster care for youth beyond age 18 until age 21. In states that have taken this option, young people can receive an additional three years of foster care support to prepare for the transition into adulthood.

    ACF contracted with the Urban Institute and its partner Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to plan for the next generation of...

    Youth transitioning out of foster care and into adulthood need many supports to navigate the challenges they face. Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Foster Care Independence Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to create the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (the Chafee Program). This amendment doubled the maximum amount of funds potentially available to states for independent living services and gave states greater discretion over how they use those funds. More recently, a provision in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 gave states an option to extend eligibility for Title IV-E foster care for youth beyond age 18 until age 21. In states that have taken this option, young people can receive an additional three years of foster care support to prepare for the transition into adulthood.

    ACF contracted with the Urban Institute and its partner Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to plan for the next generation of evaluation activities funded by the Chafee Program.  This brief focuses on programs that promote financial literacy and asset building.  The brief reviews what we currently know about challenges impacting the financial stability of youth as they transition out of foster care, considers the existing evidence on the effectiveness of financial literacy programs, and concludes with issues for the field to consider as we move toward the next evaluation of the Chafee Program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2016

    This set of selections focuses on two-generation strategies. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of selections focuses on two-generation strategies. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

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