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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Jayakody, Rukmalie; Stauffer, Dawn
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    Welfare reform's emphasis on work and self-sufficiency assumes that poor single mothers are similar in their status and functioning to the rest of the population. However, we find that their status is quite distinct. Logistic regression results reveal that the likelihood of working is 25% lower for those with a psychiatric disorder. Mental health problems may prevent women from undertaking the tasks necessary to find employment, or women with these problems may lack the self-confidence needed to take on new challenges. Our findings suggest that mental health problems among single mothers deserve greater attention as a barrier to self-sufficiency and highlight the need for more effective intervention and treatment efforts to improve economic and social outcomes. (author abstract)

    Welfare reform's emphasis on work and self-sufficiency assumes that poor single mothers are similar in their status and functioning to the rest of the population. However, we find that their status is quite distinct. Logistic regression results reveal that the likelihood of working is 25% lower for those with a psychiatric disorder. Mental health problems may prevent women from undertaking the tasks necessary to find employment, or women with these problems may lack the self-confidence needed to take on new challenges. Our findings suggest that mental health problems among single mothers deserve greater attention as a barrier to self-sufficiency and highlight the need for more effective intervention and treatment efforts to improve economic and social outcomes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lindhorst, Taryn Patricia
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2001

    This dissertation is an empirical policy analysis which investigates the effect of domestic violence on a woman's welfare status, employment, and mental health within the context of new policies instituted by welfare reform. It uses quantitative data from a panel survey, and qualitative narratives from respondents who reported current domestic abuse.

    Multivariate analysis of welfare outcomes finds that domestic violence affects welfare outcomes indirectly through its effect on depression. Depression is associated with unemployment, continuing on TANF, and being sanctioned off welfare. Domestic violence is one of the strongest predictors of the level of reported depression. Abuse is not directly related to whether a woman is on TANF, leaves welfare voluntarily or has been sanctioned off the program. Further analysis shows that domestic violence is not statistically significant in predicting employment. This suggests that when domestic violence affects welfare status and employment it does so through its effect on mental health.

    Women's stories about abuse indicate...

    This dissertation is an empirical policy analysis which investigates the effect of domestic violence on a woman's welfare status, employment, and mental health within the context of new policies instituted by welfare reform. It uses quantitative data from a panel survey, and qualitative narratives from respondents who reported current domestic abuse.

    Multivariate analysis of welfare outcomes finds that domestic violence affects welfare outcomes indirectly through its effect on depression. Depression is associated with unemployment, continuing on TANF, and being sanctioned off welfare. Domestic violence is one of the strongest predictors of the level of reported depression. Abuse is not directly related to whether a woman is on TANF, leaves welfare voluntarily or has been sanctioned off the program. Further analysis shows that domestic violence is not statistically significant in predicting employment. This suggests that when domestic violence affects welfare status and employment it does so through its effect on mental health.

    Women's stories about abuse indicate that domestic violence is a serious life threatening problem. Even though the state has adopted the Family Violence Option to assist women who are experiencing abuse, none of the ten women interviewed received help through this program. Reasons for the failure of this policy to provide meaningful help include the lack of knowledge women have about the policy; their unwillingness to disclose the abuse, and the inability of the system to take meaningful action on their behalf.

    None of the women in the qualitative sample were employed during the worst of the abuse. The qualitative findings suggest that the window during which violence affects employment may be relatively short for most women--a statistical effect may only be noticeable if women are surveyed during the period surrounding the end of the relationship. Narratives show that domestic violence has immediate consequences that affect employment through interaction with the criminal justice system, increased isolation, lack of stable housing, need for closer supervision of children who have also been traumatized by the abuse, and ongoing health and mental health concerns. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Chun-Hoon, Wendy L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    In the past five years, the concerted effort of working families, employers, and state and county-level social services administrators, coupled with a strong economy, produced a more than 50 percent decline in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance caseloads. However, finding employment does not always translate to income security and family stability. Low-income working families, earning below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines, often live on the edge of poverty—without health care or the ability to save and build assets.

    As more parents leave public assistance, states have taken important steps toward supporting their transition into the workforce by redirecting federal grants and state funds to meet the needs of working families. Highlighting close to 30 examples, this report recognizes some of the most promising models, state policies and local program innovations supporting low-income working families around the country. The report provides an introduction to the implementation of these programs and the level of public-private...

    In the past five years, the concerted effort of working families, employers, and state and county-level social services administrators, coupled with a strong economy, produced a more than 50 percent decline in Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance caseloads. However, finding employment does not always translate to income security and family stability. Low-income working families, earning below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines, often live on the edge of poverty—without health care or the ability to save and build assets.

    As more parents leave public assistance, states have taken important steps toward supporting their transition into the workforce by redirecting federal grants and state funds to meet the needs of working families. Highlighting close to 30 examples, this report recognizes some of the most promising models, state policies and local program innovations supporting low-income working families around the country. The report provides an introduction to the implementation of these programs and the level of public-private collaboration that often exists within each model. We also refer readers to helpful organizations and broader research and data on each of the topic areas…

    As the debate over how to reauthorize the TANF program proceeds in Congress, the release of this report on promising models for assisting low-income working families is, indeed, timely. While state fiscal crises pose serious impediments to continuing the progress made in recent years, there is momentum and public will to carry these important efforts forward. For individual states, recent elections present an opportunity for new leaders to build on the lessons learned by those that have already begun implementing the innovative policies and programs highlighted in this report. Changes in federal policy regarding food stamp provisions present yet another important step toward supporting families. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Moe, Angela M.; Bell, Myrtle P.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Research on the effects of battering on women’s lives has focused on poverty, homelessness, and welfare receipt, often centering on women who are uneducated or undereducated. The authors analyze how battering impacts the work and employability of women from various employment levels and backgrounds. Data were obtained through qualitative interviews with 19 residents of a domestic violence shelter, some of whom had obtained substantial education and built solid and lucrative careers prior to being abused. The women described instances in which battering had obstructed their ability to find work, maintain employment, and use their wages to establish greater economic independence and safety. (author abstract)

    Research on the effects of battering on women’s lives has focused on poverty, homelessness, and welfare receipt, often centering on women who are uneducated or undereducated. The authors analyze how battering impacts the work and employability of women from various employment levels and backgrounds. Data were obtained through qualitative interviews with 19 residents of a domestic violence shelter, some of whom had obtained substantial education and built solid and lucrative careers prior to being abused. The women described instances in which battering had obstructed their ability to find work, maintain employment, and use their wages to establish greater economic independence and safety. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Urban, Julie A.; Olson, Pamela N.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    Recognizing that mothers continue to bear the primary responsibility for household production, comprehensive logit models are developed to predict employment for low-income mothers. The models include a wide array of possible employment impediments, including individual, family environment, and community variables. Lack of family resource management, a variable not previously investigated in employment prediction, is found to be a significant impediment to employment. Under welfare reform, low-income mothers must balance family and work demands under severe resource constraints. Family resource management appears to play a crucial role in this balancing process. In addition, the local unemployment rate is found to be a significant predictor of employment. (author abstract)

    Recognizing that mothers continue to bear the primary responsibility for household production, comprehensive logit models are developed to predict employment for low-income mothers. The models include a wide array of possible employment impediments, including individual, family environment, and community variables. Lack of family resource management, a variable not previously investigated in employment prediction, is found to be a significant impediment to employment. Under welfare reform, low-income mothers must balance family and work demands under severe resource constraints. Family resource management appears to play a crucial role in this balancing process. In addition, the local unemployment rate is found to be a significant predictor of employment. (author abstract)

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