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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cooke, Jo; Owen, Jenny
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    Since 2003, government policy has required local authorities to provide support when they house lone teenage parents seeking accommodation. This qualitative study addresses young mothers’ routes into housing need and their experiences of housing access and support, drawing on interview and focus group data collected in 2003. The findings emphasise mothers’ preferences for forms of support which facilitate moves towards increased choice and independence. Reinforcing messages from other research, these findings also show a gap between concepts of ‘support’ embodied in government policy and those which inform practice, within agencies and among young people. (author abstract)

    Since 2003, government policy has required local authorities to provide support when they house lone teenage parents seeking accommodation. This qualitative study addresses young mothers’ routes into housing need and their experiences of housing access and support, drawing on interview and focus group data collected in 2003. The findings emphasise mothers’ preferences for forms of support which facilitate moves towards increased choice and independence. Reinforcing messages from other research, these findings also show a gap between concepts of ‘support’ embodied in government policy and those which inform practice, within agencies and among young people. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Swann-Jackson, Rebecca; Tapper, Donna; Fields, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Keeping Families Together (KFT) is a pilot initiative of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) that was designed to test the impact of permanent supportive housing for families who had been involved with the child welfare system and who had been homeless for at least a year. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the initiative targeted the most vulnerable families, aiming to improve agency collaboration in support of these families and build capacity among providers to serve them...

    Metis Associates conducted its evaluation of the KFT pilot between September 2009 and May 2010. The evaluation, which was designed to assess the extent to which the initiative met its objectives, built on work begun by Dr. Sylvia Ridlen, the project's first evaluator. It includes a retrospective assessment of the implementation of the pilot initiative and an outcome evaluation that has examined the impact of the initiative on participating KFT families. Metis conducted a review of program documentation, focus group interviews with supportive housing providers (directors...

    Keeping Families Together (KFT) is a pilot initiative of the Corporation for Supportive Housing (CSH) that was designed to test the impact of permanent supportive housing for families who had been involved with the child welfare system and who had been homeless for at least a year. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the initiative targeted the most vulnerable families, aiming to improve agency collaboration in support of these families and build capacity among providers to serve them...

    Metis Associates conducted its evaluation of the KFT pilot between September 2009 and May 2010. The evaluation, which was designed to assess the extent to which the initiative met its objectives, built on work begun by Dr. Sylvia Ridlen, the project's first evaluator. It includes a retrospective assessment of the implementation of the pilot initiative and an outcome evaluation that has examined the impact of the initiative on participating KFT families. Metis conducted a review of program documentation, focus group interviews with supportive housing providers (directors and case managers) and families, and interviews with representatives of city agencies, interviews with CSH staff and the project's clinical consultant. Limited data from interviews with KFT families conducted by Dr. Ridlen also were incorporated into this report. Several types of administrative data were analyzed. For consenting families, child welfare data were obtained from the New York City Administration for Children’s Services (ACS). Education data on public school students in the KFT families were accessed from a repository maintained by Metis through an agreement with the New York City Department of Education. Data on homelessness for a comparison group of similarly situated families who did not enter supportive housing were provided by the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS). Additional data on KFT families were obtained from case managers' records. (author summary)

  • Individual Author: Howard, Jeanne; Berzin, Stephanie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This report explores initiatives, synthesizes research findings, and makes recommendations for better meeting the needs of the growing proportion of youth who "age out" of foster care each year – and face daunting challenges in their transition to adulthood. (Author introduction)

    This report explores initiatives, synthesizes research findings, and makes recommendations for better meeting the needs of the growing proportion of youth who "age out" of foster care each year – and face daunting challenges in their transition to adulthood. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Carlson, Deven; Haveman, Robert; Kaplan, Tom; Wolfe, Barbara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    In this paper we estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the composition of recipient households and the quality of the neighborhoods in which recipient households reside. Drawing on a dataset that contains extensive information on a large and diverse panel of low-income families for up to 5 years following voucher receipt, we isolate the effects of voucher receipt using propensity score matching techniques together with regression adjustment. Full-sample results show voucher receipt to have little effect on neighborhood quality in the short-term, but some positive long-term effects. We also find that voucher receipt is tied to a higher probability of change in household composition in the year of voucher receipt, but greater stability in subsequent years. Our large sample allows us to explore differential responses of geographic and socioeconomic subgroups. Our findings have several implications for both research and policy. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a...

    In this paper we estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the composition of recipient households and the quality of the neighborhoods in which recipient households reside. Drawing on a dataset that contains extensive information on a large and diverse panel of low-income families for up to 5 years following voucher receipt, we isolate the effects of voucher receipt using propensity score matching techniques together with regression adjustment. Full-sample results show voucher receipt to have little effect on neighborhood quality in the short-term, but some positive long-term effects. We also find that voucher receipt is tied to a higher probability of change in household composition in the year of voucher receipt, but greater stability in subsequent years. Our large sample allows us to explore differential responses of geographic and socioeconomic subgroups. Our findings have several implications for both research and policy. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the University of Wisconsin.

  • Individual Author: Dion, M. Robin; Kleinman, Rebecca; Kauff, Jackie; Dworsky, Amy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    When youth in foster care reach age 18 (age 21 in some states) and leave the child welfare system without having achieved permanency through reunification, adoption, or legal guardianship, they must abruptly transition to living independently. Unlike their peers, these youth typically must make the transition without financial or other support from parents. As a result, many who age out of foster care find themselves homeless or precariously housed.

    One resource for such youth is the Family Unification Program (FUP). FUP is a special-purpose voucher program under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Housing Choice Voucher (HCV, also known as Section 8) program. The primary purpose of FUP is to provide housing vouchers to child-welfare involved families for whom the lack of adequate housing is the primary reason for imminent out-of-home placement of children or delays in family reunification. Youth ages 18 to 21 who leave foster care at age 16 or older and who do not have adequate housing, however, are also eligible for a time-limited housing...

    When youth in foster care reach age 18 (age 21 in some states) and leave the child welfare system without having achieved permanency through reunification, adoption, or legal guardianship, they must abruptly transition to living independently. Unlike their peers, these youth typically must make the transition without financial or other support from parents. As a result, many who age out of foster care find themselves homeless or precariously housed.

    One resource for such youth is the Family Unification Program (FUP). FUP is a special-purpose voucher program under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD’s) Housing Choice Voucher (HCV, also known as Section 8) program. The primary purpose of FUP is to provide housing vouchers to child-welfare involved families for whom the lack of adequate housing is the primary reason for imminent out-of-home placement of children or delays in family reunification. Youth ages 18 to 21 who leave foster care at age 16 or older and who do not have adequate housing, however, are also eligible for a time-limited housing voucher. FUP vouchers offer up to 18 months of rental subsidy and supportive services to help such youth gain skills for independent living.

    FUP functions as an interagency collaboration between local public housing agencies (PHAs) and public child welfare agencies (PCWAs). Participating communities decide whether to apply for FUP vouchers, and, if awarded vouchers, whether to serve families, youth, or both in their FUP programs. In communities using FUP for youth, PCWAs refer eligible youth to PHAs and offer supportive services to those who receive a FUP voucher. When PHAs receive youth referrals, they verify HCV eligibility and subsidize the rent of eligible youth who are able to find and secure housing.

    This report describes the extent to which—and how—communities are using FUP to support youth. The research draws on findings from a survey of PHAs administering FUP, a survey of PCWAs partnered with PHAs that serve youth, and site visits to four areas that use FUP to serve youth. The surveys were designed to identify the universe of communities providing FUP vouchers to youth and to gather basic information about how they administer the program. The site visits sought to provide a finer grained understanding of how communities are using FUP to serve this population and sought to identify promising practices and lessons learned. (author summary)

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