Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sweeten, Gary; Apel, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability...

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability of formal employment, we find no adverse effect on wages among those who are employed. We find that the most consistent negative outcomes attributable to the experience of incarceration are related to educational attainment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spaulding, Shayne; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Wallace, Dee
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Presents findings from P/PV's evaluation of Fathers at Work, a national demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, designed to help low-income noncustodial fathers increase their employment and earnings, become more involved in their children's lives, and provide them with more consistent financial support. The Fathers at Work programs offered a unique combination of job training and placement, child support and fatherhood services at six well-established community-based organizations in Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; Richmond, CA; and Roanoke, VA. Our findings suggest that the programs produced important benefits for participants, including increased earnings and child support payment. The report details the specific strategies Fathers at Work programs used and explores the policy implications of this research. (author abstract)

    Presents findings from P/PV's evaluation of Fathers at Work, a national demonstration funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, designed to help low-income noncustodial fathers increase their employment and earnings, become more involved in their children's lives, and provide them with more consistent financial support. The Fathers at Work programs offered a unique combination of job training and placement, child support and fatherhood services at six well-established community-based organizations in Chicago, IL; New York, NY; Philadelphia, PA; Richmond, CA; and Roanoke, VA. Our findings suggest that the programs produced important benefits for participants, including increased earnings and child support payment. The report details the specific strategies Fathers at Work programs used and explores the policy implications of this research. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Courtney, Mark E.; Osgood, D. W. ; Foster, Michael
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    D. Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney examine the transition to adult- hood for youth involved in social service and justice systems during childhood and adolescence. They survey the challenges faced by youth in the mental health system, the foster care system, the juvenile justice system, the criminal justice system, and special education, and by youth with physical disabilities and chronic illness, as well as runaway and homeless youth.

    One problem is that the services these vulnerable populations receive from these systems as children and adolescents often end abruptly as they transition to adulthood, even though the need for them continues. Youth must leave systems tailored for clients their age and, if they are eligible for further services at all, enter adult systems that are not equipped to address their needs. One exception is the special education system, whose services extend into early adult- hood and are designed for individuals’ needs.

    The authors review current public policies directed toward vulnerable youth in transition and find...

    D. Wayne Osgood, E. Michael Foster, and Mark E. Courtney examine the transition to adult- hood for youth involved in social service and justice systems during childhood and adolescence. They survey the challenges faced by youth in the mental health system, the foster care system, the juvenile justice system, the criminal justice system, and special education, and by youth with physical disabilities and chronic illness, as well as runaway and homeless youth.

    One problem is that the services these vulnerable populations receive from these systems as children and adolescents often end abruptly as they transition to adulthood, even though the need for them continues. Youth must leave systems tailored for clients their age and, if they are eligible for further services at all, enter adult systems that are not equipped to address their needs. One exception is the special education system, whose services extend into early adult- hood and are designed for individuals’ needs.

    The authors review current public policies directed toward vulnerable youth in transition and find problems in four areas: eligibility criteria that exclude youth from services that might benefit them, inadequate funding for transition services, a lack of coordination across service systems, and inadequate training about young-adult developmental issues for service professionals.

    The authors then discuss policy options that can help create a developmentally appropriate and socially inclusive system of support for vulnerable youth. Among the options are strengthening all programs for youth in transition, improving the existing systems of care for children and adolescents, addressing the loss of access to services at the age of majority, and coordinating today’s multiple systems into a single coherent system. The authors see heightened governmental interest in better supports for vulnerable young adults, both through expanding the federal role in their lives and through improving coordination of the systems that serve them. The Fostering Connections Act of 2008, for example, extended services to adolescents in foster care from the age of eighteen to the age of twenty-one. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Simms, Margaret; McDaniel, Marla; Monson, William; Fortuny, Karina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    A large number of US men of prime working age are neither gainfully employed nor pursuing education or other training, suggesting a potentially significant disconnection from mainstream economic and social life. This paper concentrates on the experiences and challenges of men at the margins between the ages of 18 and 44, when most American males are engaged in such activities as working and building skills, forming and strengthening families, and linking to social institutions. The review focuses on their experiences in five domains: education, employment, family, criminal justice, and health, featuring key themes from ethnographic and other qualitative research. (author abstract)

    A large number of US men of prime working age are neither gainfully employed nor pursuing education or other training, suggesting a potentially significant disconnection from mainstream economic and social life. This paper concentrates on the experiences and challenges of men at the margins between the ages of 18 and 44, when most American males are engaged in such activities as working and building skills, forming and strengthening families, and linking to social institutions. The review focuses on their experiences in five domains: education, employment, family, criminal justice, and health, featuring key themes from ethnographic and other qualitative research. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Willison, Janeen; Bieler, Sam; Kim, KiDeuk
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This study evaluates two of Allegheny County (PA)s programs to improve the successful reintegration of jail inmates following their return to the community. Both programs were designed to reduce re-offending through the use of risk/needs assessment, coordinated reentry planning, and the use of evidence-based programs and practices. Urban researchers conducted process and outcome evaluations of these programs to answer critical questions about program performance and effectiveness. The process evaluation examined alignment with core correctional practices, while the outcome evaluation examined rearrests for reentry program participants and two comparison groups of offenders (total N=798). Analyses indicate that both reentry programs reduce rearrest and prolong time to rearrest. These findings are supported by ample evidence of strong program implementation. (author abstract) 

    This study evaluates two of Allegheny County (PA)s programs to improve the successful reintegration of jail inmates following their return to the community. Both programs were designed to reduce re-offending through the use of risk/needs assessment, coordinated reentry planning, and the use of evidence-based programs and practices. Urban researchers conducted process and outcome evaluations of these programs to answer critical questions about program performance and effectiveness. The process evaluation examined alignment with core correctional practices, while the outcome evaluation examined rearrests for reentry program participants and two comparison groups of offenders (total N=798). Analyses indicate that both reentry programs reduce rearrest and prolong time to rearrest. These findings are supported by ample evidence of strong program implementation. (author abstract) 

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2007 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations