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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Schroeder, Daniel; Walker, Kimberly; Khan, Amna
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The focus of this report is the Non-Custodial Parent Choices PEER curriculum enhancement pilot. The PEER pilot, which began in late 2010 in Hidalgo County, El Paso, and Beaumont/Port Arthur, tests whether the addition of a curriculum including parenting and relationship skills and financial literacy to the standard workforce development services in the original program can measurably enhance the program's impacts on the ability of low-income non-custodial parents (NCPs) to support their children. This report describes the early impacts of this pilot, which has thus far shown success in increasing child support collections. (author abstract)

    The focus of this report is the Non-Custodial Parent Choices PEER curriculum enhancement pilot. The PEER pilot, which began in late 2010 in Hidalgo County, El Paso, and Beaumont/Port Arthur, tests whether the addition of a curriculum including parenting and relationship skills and financial literacy to the standard workforce development services in the original program can measurably enhance the program's impacts on the ability of low-income non-custodial parents (NCPs) to support their children. This report describes the early impacts of this pilot, which has thus far shown success in increasing child support collections. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Barnes, Carolyn; Danziger, Sandra K.; Rodems, Richard
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Research on public welfare agencies demonstrates that the design of the cash assistance program negatively affects recipients’ external political efficacy and political participation. This line of research suggests that public welfare administration may have political feedback effects on mass political behavior in two ways: 1) by offering resources and incentives for political action (resource effects) and 2) by providing information and meaning (interpretive effects). Essentially, policies teach lessons about citizenship, government, and politics that influence people’s values and attitudes, group identities, their orientations to government, and patterns of political participation.

    Our inquiry examines these questions in the context of a voluntary private social service program, Starfish Family Success Program (FSP). We ask whether and how participation shapes the efficacy beliefs of low income parents and specifically disconnected parents in the Detroit metro area. Our data consists of panel survey data and in-depth interview data collected as part of a program...

    Research on public welfare agencies demonstrates that the design of the cash assistance program negatively affects recipients’ external political efficacy and political participation. This line of research suggests that public welfare administration may have political feedback effects on mass political behavior in two ways: 1) by offering resources and incentives for political action (resource effects) and 2) by providing information and meaning (interpretive effects). Essentially, policies teach lessons about citizenship, government, and politics that influence people’s values and attitudes, group identities, their orientations to government, and patterns of political participation.

    Our inquiry examines these questions in the context of a voluntary private social service program, Starfish Family Success Program (FSP). We ask whether and how participation shapes the efficacy beliefs of low income parents and specifically disconnected parents in the Detroit metro area. Our data consists of panel survey data and in-depth interview data collected as part of a program evaluation of the Starfish Family Success Program. We use ordinary least squares regression to test the claim that FSP participation has spill-over effects on individuals’ values and beliefs. Through qualitative analysis, we further highlight mechanisms of program design that may affect our efficacy outcomes. The subjective reports of experiences in the FSP program highlight the most salient program attributes and how these experiences may contribute to their efficacy beliefs. Our findings suggest that voluntary FSP program participation is associated with substantial increases in both self-efficacy and parental efficacy among parents in our sample who have been disconnected from work and welfare. Our qualitative analysis supports our statistical findings regarding self-efficacy, suggesting that the FSP program is a source of social and emotional support that helps families feel empowered to improve how they navigate hardships, cope with stress and solve problems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Solomon-Fears, Carmen; Falk, Gene; Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
    Year: 2013

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the...

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the policy community that might improve the lives of low-income noncustodial fathers and their children. For example, social policy could play a role by expanding economic assistance programs to noncustodial fathers, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); and implementing strategies to prevent the build-up of unpaid child support through early intervention. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2013

    The compendium provides overviews of a large number of national, state, and other large-scale surveys and administrative records databases used by researchers to study topics related to the self-sufficiency of low-income populations. It includes several publicly accessible, easy-to-use databases that are beneficial to practitioners and policymakers. (author abstract)

     

    The compendium provides overviews of a large number of national, state, and other large-scale surveys and administrative records databases used by researchers to study topics related to the self-sufficiency of low-income populations. It includes several publicly accessible, easy-to-use databases that are beneficial to practitioners and policymakers. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of low-income working families continues to increase, from 10.2 million in 2010 up to 10.4 million in 2011 (Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013). Children are particularly hard hit, with more than 32 million children living in poverty today—many in homes where at least one parent is working (Addy, Engelhardt, & Skinner, 2013). While the United States economy continues to show signs of recovery from the Great Recession, the economic outlook for many low-income, underemployed families is bleak. The earnings gap between those who are able to obtain education leading to higher level skills and those who cannot continues to grow (The Anne E. Casey Foundation, 2005; Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013).

    To address these issues, many human services programs, including the Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) program, seek to help individuals build their capacity to obtain and keep employment. Through a set of activities known as economic stability and workforce development (ESWD), HMRF grantees work to...

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of low-income working families continues to increase, from 10.2 million in 2010 up to 10.4 million in 2011 (Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013). Children are particularly hard hit, with more than 32 million children living in poverty today—many in homes where at least one parent is working (Addy, Engelhardt, & Skinner, 2013). While the United States economy continues to show signs of recovery from the Great Recession, the economic outlook for many low-income, underemployed families is bleak. The earnings gap between those who are able to obtain education leading to higher level skills and those who cannot continues to grow (The Anne E. Casey Foundation, 2005; Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013).

    To address these issues, many human services programs, including the Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) program, seek to help individuals build their capacity to obtain and keep employment. Through a set of activities known as economic stability and workforce development (ESWD), HMRF grantees work to improve the economic well-being of children and families through employment and career advancement.

    To support organizations in implementing effective ESWD services, OFA has developed a conceptual framework for guiding HMRF programs in establishing and strengthening systems to support participants in achieving economic stability. The framework is designed to help HMRF grantees more effectively organize their services for maximum impact and to strengthen partnerships with other community organizations that seek to help low-income families in find, retain, and advance in employment. This framework, called A Community-Based HMRF Workforce Strategy, links key concepts of economic stability with specific strategies that programs and participants can employ.

    Based on the conceptual workforce strategy, this toolkit provides suggestions and resources regarding key case management and service delivery components. Together, those components can meaningfully help low-income program participants move along a pathway toward job and financial security. The toolkit comprises five modules that align with the key component of the ESWD framework—from intake and assessment to work retention and career advancement. (author introduction)

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