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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Princeton University
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2006

    Description:The New Immigrant Survey (NIS)provides a public use database on new legal immigrants to the United States and their children that will be useful for addressing scientific and policy questions about migration behavior and the impacts of migration.

    Population: Nationally representative sample of new legal immigrants and their children in the United States. 8,573 adults and 810 children completed interviews.

    Periodicity: The baseline survey was conducted from June 2003 to June 2004. A survey pilot project (NIS-P) was carried out in 1996 to inform the fielding and design of the full NIS. The follow-up interview (NIS-2003-2) was conducted from June 2007 to December 2009.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency...

  • Individual Author: Gardiner, Karen; Turner, Lasley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    In Colorado, county human service and social service departments provide a range of programs for adults, youth and relative caretakers to help stabilize families, increase self-sufficiency, and prevent the intergenerational transmission of welfare dependency.  This report provides an overview of services offered in Colorado.  The report also highlights three broad areas of innovative family-related and prevention services, including collaborations with child welfare and other efforts to prevent out-of-home placements, programs designed to increase child well-being through parental involvement and access to quality child care, and a broad array of youth programs including non-marital pregnancy prevention programs, summer employment and training initiatives, and in-school services for high-risk youth. (author abstract)

    In Colorado, county human service and social service departments provide a range of programs for adults, youth and relative caretakers to help stabilize families, increase self-sufficiency, and prevent the intergenerational transmission of welfare dependency.  This report provides an overview of services offered in Colorado.  The report also highlights three broad areas of innovative family-related and prevention services, including collaborations with child welfare and other efforts to prevent out-of-home placements, programs designed to increase child well-being through parental involvement and access to quality child care, and a broad array of youth programs including non-marital pregnancy prevention programs, summer employment and training initiatives, and in-school services for high-risk youth. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kennedy, Angie C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    The federal welfare reforms of 1996 mandated that all minor adolescent mothers receiving cash assistance must attend school and live at home to receive their cash grant. Though this law has been in place for over 8 years, little research has been done that explores the barriers facing adolescent mothers who try to attend school and live at home. Anecdotal and qualitative evidence from welfare reform evaluation studies suggests that violence may be just such a barrier. This article reviews the recent empirical literature on urban adolescent mothers' exposure to multiple forms of violence. The author delineates and critiques the existing research on the prevalence of and outcomes linked with exposure to community violence, witnessed parental violence, physical abuse within the family, and partner violence among this population. The article concludes with recommendations for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in light of the reviewed findings. (author abstract)

    The federal welfare reforms of 1996 mandated that all minor adolescent mothers receiving cash assistance must attend school and live at home to receive their cash grant. Though this law has been in place for over 8 years, little research has been done that explores the barriers facing adolescent mothers who try to attend school and live at home. Anecdotal and qualitative evidence from welfare reform evaluation studies suggests that violence may be just such a barrier. This article reviews the recent empirical literature on urban adolescent mothers' exposure to multiple forms of violence. The author delineates and critiques the existing research on the prevalence of and outcomes linked with exposure to community violence, witnessed parental violence, physical abuse within the family, and partner violence among this population. The article concludes with recommendations for researchers, practitioners, and policy makers in light of the reviewed findings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sweeten, Gary; Apel, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability...

    Existing research establishes a lengthy list of adverse outcomes of incarceration that includes an elevated risk of criminal offending as well as unfavorable outcomes in the labor market, the institution of education, and the marriage market. These findings are consistent enough that it is tempting to attribute them to the causal effect of incarceration, particularly to the social stigma that attaches to individuals with a prison record. In light of the recent visibility of this research and the importance of public policies that flow logically from it, we revisit the impact of juvenile (ages 16-17) and young adult (18-19) incarceration on short- and medium-term outcomes in a variety of domains. This paper is directly concerned with the problem of causal identification. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 to estimate difference-indifferences models as well as propensity score matching. The empirical results suggest that there is evidence of causal effects for some types of outcomes. For example, while we find that incarceration reduces the probability of formal employment, we find no adverse effect on wages among those who are employed. We find that the most consistent negative outcomes attributable to the experience of incarceration are related to educational attainment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hao, Lingxin; Astone, Nan M.; Cherlin, Andrew J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This paper is an assessment of the impact of child support enforcement and welfare policies on nonmarital teenage childbearing and motherhood. We derive four hypotheses about the effects of policies on nonmarital teenage childbearing and motherhood. We propose that teenage motherhood and school enrollment are joint decisions for teenage girls. Based on individual trajectories during ages 12–19, our analysis uses an event history model for nonmarital teenage childbearing and a dynamic model of motherhood that is jointly determined with school enrollment. We find some evidence that child support policies indirectly reduce teen motherhood by increasing the probability of school enrollment, which, in turn, reduces the probability of teen motherhood. This finding suggests that welfare offices may wish to place greater weight on outreach programs that inform more teenagers of the existence of strong child support enforcement measures. Such programs might reduce nonmarital teen motherhood further and thus reduce the need for welfare support and child support enforcement in the long run...

    This paper is an assessment of the impact of child support enforcement and welfare policies on nonmarital teenage childbearing and motherhood. We derive four hypotheses about the effects of policies on nonmarital teenage childbearing and motherhood. We propose that teenage motherhood and school enrollment are joint decisions for teenage girls. Based on individual trajectories during ages 12–19, our analysis uses an event history model for nonmarital teenage childbearing and a dynamic model of motherhood that is jointly determined with school enrollment. We find some evidence that child support policies indirectly reduce teen motherhood by increasing the probability of school enrollment, which, in turn, reduces the probability of teen motherhood. This finding suggests that welfare offices may wish to place greater weight on outreach programs that inform more teenagers of the existence of strong child support enforcement measures. Such programs might reduce nonmarital teen motherhood further and thus reduce the need for welfare support and child support enforcement in the long run. (author abstract)

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