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Improving the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in adolescent reproductive health care services

Individual Author: 
Romero, Lisa M.
Middleton, Dawn
Mueller, Trisha
Avellino, Lia
Hallum-Montes, Rachel

Purpose: The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement.

Toxic stress and protective factors in multi-ethnic school age children: A research protocol

Individual Author: 
Condon, Eileen M.
Sadler, Lois S.
Mayes, Linda C.

Exposure to stressful environments in early childhood can cause a toxic stress response and lead to poor health outcomes, including obesity, cardiac disease, diabetes, and mental illness. In animals and maltreated children, the presence of a nurturing caregiver can buffer against the physiological disruptions associated with a toxic stress response; however, the specific caregiver and parenting characteristics that best promote a protective relationship in humans remain largely unexplored, particularly in families living in high-risk environments.

Developing American Job Centers in jails: Implementation of the Linking to Employment Activities Pre-Release (LEAP) grants

Individual Author: 
Bellotti, Jeanne
Sattar, Samina
Gould-Werth, Alix
Berk, Jillian
Gutierrez, Ivette
Stein, Jillian
Betesh, Hannah
Ochoa, Lindsay
Wiegand, Andrew

To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs.

Predicting repeated and persistent family homelessness: Do families’ characteristics and experiences matter?

Individual Author: 
Glendening, Zachary
Shinn, Marybeth

Research indicates that most families using emergency shelters stay briefly—one to four or five months—and rarely return (Culhane et al. 2007). However, some families remain homeless for long periods of time or experience repeated episodes of homelessness. These families may have characteristics and service needs that differ from those of families who leave shelter quickly and permanently. Communities and homelessness practitioners might benefit from identifying those families’ characteristics and experiences to improve targeting of services.

Short-time compensation as a tool to mitigate job loss? Evidence on the U.S. experience during the recent recession

Individual Author: 
Abraham, Katharine G.
Houseman, Susan N.

During the recent recession only seventeen states offered short-time compensation (STC)—prorated unemployment benefits for workers whose hours are reduced for economic reasons. Federal legislation passed in 2012 will encourage the expansion of STC. Exploiting cross-state variation in STC, we present new evidence indicating that jobs saved during the recession as a consequence of STC may have been significant in manufacturing, but that the overall scale of the STC program was generally too small to have substantially mitigated aggregate job losses in the seventeen states.

Homeless families’ experiences with public benefit programs, employment, and family transitions

Individual Author: 
Benton, Amanda
Dunton, Lauren
Khadduri, Jill
Walton, Douglas

These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

A randomized controlled trial of Child FIRST: A comprehensive home-based intervention translating research into early childhood practice

Individual Author: 
Lowell, Darcy I.
Carter, Alice S.
Godoy, Leandra
Paulicin, Belinda
Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.

This randomized, controlled trial was designed to document the effectiveness of Child FIRST (Child and Family Interagency, Resource, Support, and Training), a home-based psychotherapeutic, parent-child intervention embedded in a system of care. Multirisk urban mothers and children, ages 6-36 months (= 157) participated. At the 12-month follow-up, Child FIRST children had improved language (odd ratio [OR] = 4.4) and externalizing symptoms (OR = 4.7) compared to Usual Care children.

Helping families involved in the child welfare system achieve housing stability

Individual Author: 
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Baum, Abigail
Luna, Jessica

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)‘s Family Unification Program (FUP) provides low-income families involved in the child welfare system with housing vouchers. FUP is an important vehicle for understanding three issues: (1) the overlap between the child welfare system, housing, and homelessness; (2) how to provide housing to vulnerable, high-need families; and (3) how to facilitate cross-system partnerships between public housing agencies and child welfare agencies.

Improving employment outcomes and community integration for veterans with disabilities: Early implementation of the Progressive Goal Attainment Program (PGAP) for Veterans Demonstration

Individual Author: 
Hossain, Farhana
Baird, Peter
Pardoe, Rachel

Many U.S. military veterans have mental and physical disabilities that can increase their risk of substance abuse, social isolation, unemployment, and homelessness. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it urgently necessary to address these issues once again as the nation faces “the largest wave of returning veterans with disabilities in recent history.” One in four veterans of these conflicts reports a service-connected disability, and unemployment among the youngest subset of veterans is particularly high.