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America's child care deserts in 2018

Individual Author: 
Malik, Rasheed
Hamm, Katie
Schochet, Leila
Novoa, Cristina
Workman, Simon
Jessen-Howard, Steven

For this report, the Center for American Progress collected and analyzed data on the location and capacity of licensed or registered child care providers in every state and Washington, D.C. These data were synthesized with estimates of the population, family income, and labor force participation rates in every one of the country’s 73,057 census tracts. This original and comprehensive analysis of child care supply at the census tract level finds that 51 percent of Americans live in child care deserts.

How do sprawl and inequality affect well-being in American cities?

Individual Author: 
Lee, Wen Hao
Ambrey, Christopher
Pojani, Dorina

This study investigates whether income inequality is related to sprawl and wellbeing in American cities. The results do not provide evidence to support the role of income inequality as a mediator of the link between sprawl and well-being. Instead, the results tell a more nuanced story. Specifically, they indicate that consistent with a priori expectations, lower levels of sprawl are, on average, associated with lower levels of income inequality. Additionally, lower levels of sprawl correspond to higher levels of financial well-being.

Employment coaching: Working with low-income populations to use self-regulation skills to achieve employment goals

Individual Author: 
Joyce, Kristen
McConnell, Sheena

New research has led policymakers and researchers to argue that some people might not achieve economic independence in part because of difficulty applying the self-regulation skills needed to get, keep, and advance in a job (Pavetti 2018; Cavadel et al. 2017). These self-regulation skills—sometimes referred to as soft skills or executive functioning skills—include the ability to finish tasks, stay organized, and control emotions.

Long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions to promote resilience of children and adolescents

Individual Author: 
Sandler, Irwin
Ingram, Alexandra
Wolchik, Sharlene
Tein, Jenn-Yun
Winslow, Emily

In this article, we address three questions concerning the long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions: 1) Do prevention programs promote effective parenting in families facing normative stressors as well as those facing frequent adversity? 2) Do parenting programs prevent children’s long-term problems? 3) Do changes in parenting mediate long-term effects of programs? We address these questions by summarizing evidence from 22 programs with randomized trials and followups of three years or longer.

Resilience in children: Developmental perspectives

Individual Author: 
Masten, Ann S.
Barnes, Andrew J.

Advances in developmental resilience science are highlighted with commentary on implications for pediatric systems that aspire to promote healthy development over the life course. Resilience science is surging along with growing concerns about the consequences of adverse childhood experiences on lifelong development. Resilience is defined as the capacity of a system to adapt successfully to challenges that threaten the function, survival, or future development of the system.

Resilience of children with refugee statuses: A research review

Individual Author: 
Pieloch, Kerrie A.
Marks, Amy K.
McCullough, Mary Beth

Over the past several decades, an increasing number of refugee children and families have involuntarily migrated to countries around the world to seek safety and refuge. As the refugee population increases, it is becoming more important to understand factors that promote and foster resilience among refugee youth. The present review examines the past 20 years of resilience research with refugee children to identify individual, family, school, community, and societal factors fostering resilience.

Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents

Individual Author: 
Wilson-Simmons, Renée
Jiang, Yang
Aratani, Yumiko

Despite the multitude of obstacles that low-income parents face, many of them succeed in helping their children flourish. They raise children who possess the social-emotional competence needed to develop and keep friendships; establish good relationships with parents, teachers, and other adults; and experience a range of achievements that contribute to their selfconfidence, self-esteem, and self-efficacy.

Are Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

Individual Author: 
Morgan, Paul L.
Farkas, George
Cook, Michael
Strassfeld, Natasha M.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Pun, Wik Hung
Wang, Yangyang
Schussler, Deborah L.

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively.

The decline of cash assistance and the well-being of poor households with children

Individual Author: 
Shaefer, H. Luke
Edin, Kathryn
Fusaro, Vincent
Wu, Pinghui

Since the early 1990s, the social safety net for families with children in the United States has undergone an epochal transformation. Aid to poor working families has become more generous. In contrast, assistance to the deeply poor has declined sharply, and what remains often takes the form of in-kind aid. A historical view finds that this dramatic change mirrors others. For centuries, the nature and form of poor relief has been driven in part by shifting cultural notions of which social groups constitute the “deserving” and “undeserving” poor. This line was firmly redrawn in the 1990s.

Withdrawal, attachment security, and recovery from conflict in couple relationships

Individual Author: 
Prager, Karen J.
Poucher, Jesse
Shirvani, Forouz K.
Parsons, Julie A.
Allam, Zoheb

This study used 115 cohabiting couple partners’ 21-day diaries, with which they reported each evening on their moods and their relationships, to test hypotheses about connections between withdrawal following conflict, attachment insecurity, and affective recovery from conflict (i.e., post-conflict relationship satisfaction, positive and negative mood, and intimacy). Individuals reported on their own and their partners’ post-conflict withdrawals.